Where Time Stops

Time moves fast. Every moment seems to pass by faster and faster than the one before. New distractions are always at our fingertips: one buzz and you are linked into a whole virtual world. We daydream of far-off places, wondering how we could ever match the experiences posted by everyone else. Counting the reasons why our life isn’t following the same ‘perfect’ path that we see on our screens. So caught up in trying to manicure our lives that we never stop to live our own.

There is beauty in disconnection. Wonder in the unknown. An excitement in accepting that there isn’t any one path. There is contentment in doing exactly what makes you happy, no matter how crazy people may think you are.

So here I am. Staring up at a limestone bluff. A lush, deciduous forest bursting with life above it. Below trickles a slow, wandering creek. It follows the low spots of the rock bottom. On rare occasions, it narrows, creating deep holes teeming with life.

Unnamed Creek

There I stand. A four-foot collapsible fishing rod in my hand. A hook so small, reading glasses are required to bait it. An image belonging in a kids’ book: a man so obsessed with fish he would search even the smallest puddles. The truth is each of those puddles are magic. The longer you look into them, the more life you can see. Creek Chubs scurry about, fighting one another for any scrap of food. The other minnows mine the bottom, searching for the rare morsel that escapes the chubs.

Creek Chub

These scavengers are careful. They graze around each tiny rock. When you are still, you can get lost seeing the small schools systematically search each quadrant of the pool. Watching in amusement, my curiosity gets the best of me. I drop my comically miniscule hook to the bottom. The minnows scatter. (A reasonable response for a creature on the bottom of the food chain.) I leave the bait resting on the bottom. They feed in a pattern, and I know they will return to this area soon. I carefully watch my hook as the minutes pass. The first brave minnow returns and finds my bait. The tiniest tug on my line and suddenly I’m happily holding one of these bottom-grazing beauties. A quick glance and I recognize a familiar face. It’s a Bluntnose Minnow! They are thriving in the creek this year.

Bluntnose Minnow

My curiosity isn’t so easily sated. The occasional ghost of a larger fish dances around the Bluntnose Minnows. This fish is different. I stand there huddled over the creek, dropping my bait down over and over again. Pulling up one Bluntnose Minnow after another. I’m starting to question my sanity when a silver flash happens as my bait drops. Could this finally be it? A small, silver fish wiggles at the end of the tiny hook. I don’t recognize the fish. It’s something new! My 107th species of fish caught on hook and line. The Silverjaw Minnow!

I sit on the sand beside the creek and smile. Life is simple here. It is a place a where two-inch fish can make a person’s day. The sound of singing birds surrounds me, harmonizing with the babbling creek. A vibrant forest breathes. Time has no meaning in a place like this.

Silverjaw Minnow

A Blue Jay flashes, letting me know I have over-extended my welcome here. I wade down the creek. I walk slowly to see what minnows will make themselves visible. Creek Chubs dash left and right. The Bluntnose and Silverjaw Minnows retreat to the deepest pools as I pass. And then I see something unique and pure. The creek narrows to a foot wide. A single pool the size of a basketball cut into the rock floor. The water rips through here. A perfect habitat for an amazingly unique fish. I get down on my knees and shade my eyes with my hands. At first, all I see is the water rushing over smooth brown rocks. I focus harder. An odd, triangular shape points out of a crack between two stones. There it is. The queen of this creek. The humble Spottail Darter, perfectly camouflaged. This tiny pool is thriving. Darters are resting on the bottom against the rocks, just waiting for a snack to wash down. A wee insect floats down and one zips out from the bottom, the meal vanishing in a heartbeat. I get my fishing rod back out. How could I pass up such a perfect opportunity? My little hook touches the water and a darter shoots out of the rock. A quick picture and it is back safely.

Spottail Darter

Content with the time spent wading in the creek, I make the slow walk back to the car. The distractions of the ‘real’ world can’t touch me here. I smile as the Blue Jay scolds me one last time. One last long look at the limestone bluff. The trees a vibrant green contrasting against the blue sky. I close my eyes. One last deep breath of the pure forest air, imprinting every detail of this place until I return.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

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Road Trip To California

I’ve been anxiously waiting for this road trip for a long time. I was simultaneously terrified and exhilarated at the thought of moving from the Midwest to California. As my departure date got closer and closer, I started getting more and more anxious, but instead of letting that get to me, I invested as much as that energy as I could into researching and planning each stop of my trip. Finally, on a bright Tuesday morning, my day arrived: I hopped into my little SUV (full of my life in boxes) and started my trip.

The first leg of my journey took me from Indiana to the Meramec River near St. Louis, Missouri. My research told me that this river was a great spot to catch Redhorse suckers of multiple species. Sadly, once I got there, I didn’t feel very confident about my prospects. I had picked a location that was too close to the Mississippi River, and as expected, I could not get past the great number of Freshwater Drum and Channel Catfish to get to any of the more exciting species.

Freshwater Drum

Channel Catfish

Seeing that I wasn’t going to catch my target species, I switched over to my microfishing tactics. I was hoping I could find something exciting before the hour and a half I had budgeted for this spot ran out. But no new species made an appearance. I ended up catching a good number of small Bluegill, Spotfin Shiners and Steelcolor Shiners. They were all cool fish to catch, but nothing that helped me to add fish species to my list.

Bluegill

Spotfin Shiner

Finally realizing that I wasn’t going to be able to add any new species at this spot, I hiked back to my car to finish up the drive for the day. I drove west until I got to the other end of Missouri and camped at Shoal Creek.

Shoal Creek

My goal was (once again) to catch any form of a sucker. As soon as I approached the shore, I saw a small Northern Hogsucker and thought perhaps it wasn’t going to be a difficult thing. But I was so very wrong. That particular sucker disappeared as I was getting my rods set up, and I didn’t see another for the rest of my time there. I spent some time targeting suckers, but once it became clear that wasn’t going to happen during the day time, I switched my attention over to sunfish. One of my goals was to catch a Missouri Longear Sunfish. These fish look dramatically different than the Longear Sunfish we had in Indiana. These have much deeper reds as well as a red line down the nape.

Longear Sunfish (Missouri)

Once I caught one of these gorgeous sunfish, I started trying to catch as many species as I could before it got dark. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this creek was wildly diverse.

Largemouth Bass

Bluegill

Rock Bass

Redear Sunfish

Black Crappie

I had hoped that once it got dark the sunfish would stop finding my baits as often and I would be able to keep a bait in place long enough for a sucker to find it. What I forgot about was that the catfish would get active once the sun went down. As you’d expect, I ended up catching little Channel Catfish instead of suckers.

Channel Catfish

With this frustrating discovery, I decided to try something new. I’ve never microfished at night and it sounded like it could be a wildly productive thing. So, I put on my headlamp and started walking around the shallow areas of the creek. It didn’t take long to find where the various minnows were hiding. I saw a lot of species I recognized, but there were a few, odd, larger, white minnows scattered around. I had a good feeling that they would be a new species for me, so I spent my time trying to get one to bite. After a half an hour of putting a small piece of worm in front of these little fishes faces, one finally attacked the hook. As soon as I had the fish in my hand, I knew it was something new, though I’ll admit I couldn’t figure out its identity. After taking the pictures I needed, I released it back to the creek. I knew I would have plenty of time to work out its identity after this trip was done.

Whitetail Shiner

I caught a few other species during the night, but nothing new or particularly exciting. In the morning, I explored the riffles of the creek in search of another Rainbow Darter. To my disappointment, the creek was on the rise and I couldn’t find any. However, I did find the perfect habitat for Green Sunfish and took the opportunity to catch one since I didn’t have a good picture of one from this location yet.

Green Sunfish

Before starting the next leg of my trip, I wanted to catch one of the Topminnows I kept seeing. I expected them to be the usual Blackstripe Topminnows we had back in southern Indiana, but instead, they were Blackspotted Topminnows! This wasn’t a new species for me, but I still needed a good photograph of one so this was a pleasant surprise.

Blackspotted Topminnow

With that catch, I started the long drive to Texas. This was the drive I was dreading the most. Thankfully, the time changes were on my side and I got there before it got too late. I decided to camp the night at Lake Meredith, which conveniently was supposed to be good fishing. Seeing this lake was an amazing sight. I hadn’t seen any sign of water for quite some time and suddenly in the middle of this red terrain was this giant, blue mass surrounded by these gorgeous, rocky cliffs.

Lake Meredith

I had expected this lake to be a huge challenge to fish because of how large it was and the fact that the climate was so different than what I’m used to. But to my surprise, there were a large number of little sunfish in the shallows. I had expected to catch mostly Bluegill here, but here was an enormous population of Orangespotted Sunfish! I was even able to catch a few Longear Sunfish, which looked remarkably different than any of the others I’ve sampled in other states. I imagine within the next few years they will finally start separating Longear Sunfish into multiple distinct species, much like what they have been doing with black bass over the last couple of years.

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Bluegill

Green Sunfish

I kept seeing small minnows with gorgeous red fins darting around while I was fishing for sunfish, and I couldn’t leave this lake without catching one to add to my species list. I tied on a size 28 fly hook and tipped it with a small piece of worm (the Bluegill stole the last of my tango hooks when I was at the Meramec River). It didn’t take long before one of these little beauties found my bait! After getting some good photos to properly identify him, he was safely released and swam off back to other minnows in the shallows.

With that little shiner, I decided to hop back in my car and make my way down to the area below the lake’s dam, where the Canadian River starts to reform. The landscape was breathtaking, even though the rocks I had to hike over looked like rattlesnake heaven.

Here, there is a nice little fishing pier, but there was a family with two young kids fishing off it that were having so much fun that I didn’t want to crowd them. I hiked down from the dam a little ways and set up my gear in a break in the reeds. I quickly started seeing fish hanging around the rocks near the bank. The water was amazingly clear (I could see straight to the bottom at depths over 10 foot, a very different case than most waterways in Indiana). I could see many familiar fish moving around, but one type in particular caught my eye. I could see a few Golden Shiners on the outskirts of the margins, and I knew that would be my first target. I have good pictures of most of the species I’ve caught, but the day I caught my first Golden Shiner, I didn’t take my good camera and all I had was an incredibly grainy picture from an old video camera. It took a few tries to get past the large number of Green Sunfish, but I did manage to get a Golden Shiner to take a small piece of worm.

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Golden Shiner

There were a few other minnows hiding in the cracks of the shallow rocks, but once again, my search for microfish was thwarted by Western Mosquitofish. They were just too numerous for me to be able to get past, so I quickly gave up on my search.

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Western Mosquitofish

At this point, I decided to play around with the sunfish. I figured there had to be some more Longear Sunfish down here, but to my surprise, all I found were Green Sunfish, and not just a few…I have never seen so many greenies in one place before in my life. I caught close to 50 of these guys before giving up on the idea of getting any other kind of sunfish.

One of the coolest things that happened while I was fishing this spot was a small group of Bullhead Catfish wandered in and started searching around for food. I was able to pitch a worm toward them and was lucky enough to get it past the sunfish. It was amazing to see how quickly these fish could zero in on a bait. Not a new species for me, but it was pretty neat to see a Black Bullhead from a different location.

Checking my phone, I realized that it was going to get dark soon and I hadn’t even decided where I was going to camp yet. I quickly dashed to my car and found a campsite right as the sun was setting.

That ended up being a rough night of camping. First, it was hot, and then as soon as I fell asleep, a huge thunderstorm hit the area. I ended up sleeping in my car while the storm raged on. On the bright side (since I couldn’t sleep well), I was able to start my drive to New Mexico bright and early. Sadly, this drive was cut short when my alternator went out and stranded me overnight in Tucumcari, New Mexico. Luckily, there was an auto shop that was willing to work hard on my car and get me back on the road the next afternoon.

Getting Towed To A Shop

At 2 p.m. the following day, my car repairs were finished, but I still had 4 hours of driving left to get to my campsite for the evening. That short of a drive never felt so long. I knew the only thing standing between me and trout fishing was this stretch of road. But finally, the miles ticked away and I was standing on the side of the Pecos River. And I can easily say that none of pictures even do this place half justice. It was such a calm, serene, and peaceful place that I was a little tempted not to leave.

Pecos River

This stretch of the river fell into special trout regulations, meaning I had to use barbless hooks. I’ll just go ahead and say that trout fishing and barbless hooks isn’t a very good combination. Between my spinning gear and fly rod, I lost 7 trout before finally landing a little Brown Trout on a spinner (a new species for me). I think my performance proves I need to practice using barbless hooks because between them jumping and the current, they seemed to have no problem shaking the hooks.

Brown Trout

That evening, I camped beside a small stream. Once again, I had lost track of time and didn’t arrive to the site until after the sun had set. I was very happy that I had packed my winter sleeping bag for this site. Fishing in the rain all day had chilled me to the bone and I needed to warm back up. Early the next morning, I got up before the sun had broken over the horizon. The section of the stream I was camping beside had a few decent pools formed by fallen trees, so I took the chance to throw a spinner into these spots before the sun got too high. My camera doesn’t handle low light conditions well so the picture looks way darker than it actually was, but this lovely little Brown Trout bit my spinner at 6:30 in the morning…before any of the other campers were up!

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Brown Trout

With this fish, I packed up my camp and left without disturbing any of the other campers. On my way out of the forest, I passed by Monastery Lake. I hadn’t really planned to fish this lake, but I figured if I already had my fishing license I might as well catch a few stock Rainbow Trout before leaving the state. This lake was surprisingly busy, but I hiked to the far end and found a space all to myself. I was happy to find some new minnows hiding under a water drainage pipe, so I grabbed my microfishing gear and got to work. I was happy to find a strong population of Fathead Minnows- a new species for me- so I was very excited to catch one.

Fathead Minnow

I worked my around the lake a little more and targeted the down-stream side of the water overflow. I expected some Rainbow Trout to be waiting for an easy meal, but was elated to find a much more exciting species waiting: the Rio Grande Chub! I had thought that this species was going to be a long shot to catch, but there you go!

Rio Grande Chub

With that catch, all I needed was a little Rainbow Trout and I was ready to hit the road. I spent some time tossing lures at them, but they just would not hit them. Luckily, this lake allows the use of bait, so I put a piece of worm on a hook and started slowly jigging it close to the bottom. It didn’t take long before a little Rainbow Trout found the worm and struck with all of its might. After a fun fight, this fish was donated to a family who was having trouble catching dinner and I started my next long drive.

Rainbow Trout

I arrived in Sedona, Arizona to the unwelcome realization that every single campsite was full…even though none of them allowed reservations. I decided I would worry about that later, and made my way to an access point on Oak Creek in search of my first sucker of the trip.

Oak Creek

I fished a number of different pools with no luck. I kept seeing trout come up and hit the surface, but the water was too muddy to even consider getting out the fly rod. I decided to stick with my sucker tactics and keep a small piece of worm on the bottom and wait for a bite. I ran into another angler hiking out of the canyon I was fishing in and he was kind enough to point me to a place that should hold a few fish. Words couldn’t describe how excited I was when my rod tip finally bounced and my line went tight with a fish. I was even more excited when I reeled up what turned out to be a Roundtail Chub, another new species!

Roundtail Chub

I cast my rig back out and waited for a sucker to find the bait, but this time when the rod bounced something very different was on the other end…a confused little Brown Trout. I’m not really sure why he decided my sucker rig looked attractive, but he did.

Brown Trout

With this last fish, I looked up and realized that a thunderstorm was quickly approaching. I didn’t want to be stuck down here if lightning started dancing around, so I started the hike back to my car. I was lucky enough to get the last room in a cheap motel in Sedona (my only other option was to park the car and sleep in it). Bright and early the next morning, I packed up my stuff, checked out of the motel, and made my way back to Oak Creek. I wasn’t going to let this trip end until I caught a sucker. I hiked back close to area from the day before, set up my rod, and waited for a bite. A long hour passed with only a few small nibbles but no takes. Suddenly, my rod doubled over and a fish started screaming drag downstream. When it got itself wrapped up in the reeds, I was scared my 4 lb test line wasn’t going to hold up, but eventually I worked the fish out and was absolutely over the moon to be holding a Sonora Sucker.

Sonora Sucker

Sonora Sucker

I took my quick pictures and then released him back into the creek. I was shaking from excitement after that catch; I don’t think many other people get this excited to catch a sucker. I had seen a few minnows hiding near the reeds that the sucker had gotten tangled in, so I decided to tie on my micro gear and see if I could catch one. Most of them were far too small to be able to get a size 28 fly hook in their mouth, but one of the larger minnows charged my bait and I was thrilled see another new species for me: the Speckled Dace!

Speckled Dace

With this fish, I knew I was out of time and I needed to start the final leg of my drive to Los Angeles. I’ll admit that this was the part of the drive I was most anxious about: I hadn’t ever tried to navigate traffic like they have there. But I knew that it was time for me to face that fear head on. I’m happy to report that I arrived safely and that the driving wasn’t nearly as frightening as I expected. This trip was a once in a lifetime experience and I’m so happy that I’m finally out in California. Life out here is rather different than back in Indiana, but that isn’t a bad thing. There is still plenty of nature to enjoy. You just have to look in different places, and exploring for those places is half the fun!

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Now it is time to explore the fishing that California has to offer. I’ve already found some new places to try for Carp, Tilapia, Plecostomus, Largemouth Bass and Bluegill, plus the wide variety of saltwater fishing piers that can provide seemingly endless amounts of fish. But that will have to be another blog post in and of itself.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

 

Creek and River Hopping

Watching the water levels change in the Ohio River is my favorite part of driving to school every day. When I see it rising high enough to start entering the flood plains, I never fail to get excited. This always means two things: Any eddies you can find on the main stem of the Ohio River should be full of fish, and all of the creeks should also be teaming with fish escaping the high current.

The river was starting to reach that magical height when I decided to play a risky game. One of my favorite challenges in fishing is using an ultralight setup in the most difficult conditions possible, and the Ohio River never ceases to offer opportunities to test your abilities. On a lovely Sunday afternoon, I found myself beside the boat launch at Angel Mounds armed with a couple of my lightest rods. I rigged them with a simple, tight line setup with nightcrawlers and cast them into the current break downstream of the launch. It didn’t take long before my first rod bounced and I set the hook into a lovely little Channel Catfish.

It seemed like every ten minutes or so, a rod would bounce and I would reel up a small Channel Catfish or Freshwater Drum. I played with these fish until some large logs got washed downstream into this eddy and made fishing impossible.

The water stayed high throughout most of this month, so I spent a lot of time creek hopping. [Location name redacted] is one of my favorite places to fish when the river levels are high. This backwater creek is always full of species that many people don’t target. I usually target the deeper sections of the creek early in the year, but with the temperatures starting to creep higher the fish have been moving to the shallower sections of the creek. These fish are always easily spooked, but that makes the challenge of catching them all the more fun. On my first hike back to a shallow stretch here, I thought I spotted something I hadn’t seen in two years: a Grass Pickerel. But before I could investigate, the fish vanished across the creek. I managed to scare this fish off during my next three ventures, but on a lucky hike, I managed to catch it off-guard and landed a small jig right in front of his face. To my surprise, the fish made a quick dash and my jig vanished. I set the hook and was delighted to see a small Grass Pickerel.

After documenting its size and location, I released this little fish back into the creek and moved on to my next spot. The lily pads have started to grow here and a decent number of predatory fish are taking advantage of them as ambush points. Like this little Largemouth Bass.

Another stretch of this creek held a fish I hadn’t seen inhabit this waterway before: a little Redear Sunfish. It turns out that this section of the creek now houses a large number of these fish! I’ve fished this creek for years and this is the first time I’ve ever seen them, so that is a pretty interesting new change.

I couldn’t give up on this spot until I caught one of all time favorite fish, the Flier Sunfish. This one had to be tempted with Bee Moths put on the smallest jig I could find.

This little stretch of the creek housed some amazing panfish diversity. Tossing my jig toward a branch that was partially submerged, something darted out and attacked my jig but managed to miss the hook. I tossed back into that spot, and this time the fish didn’t get as lucky. After a quick fight on light tackle, I was greeted with a feisty little Warmouth. These guys start getting abundant in this creek come May.

That same branch seemed to be home to another similar species: the Green Sunfish. My favorite comparison I’ve heard is that they are the “micro version” of a grouper, and I couldn’t agree more. They put up a great fight on light tackle and are very willing to hit most baits.

As the month continued, the weather kept getting nicer and more people have been deciding to get out and go fishing. I’m always excited to see people out fishing and enjoying nature, but this is usually when I start going to some of my more remote places where I know less people will be at. This led me to one of my favorite little creeks in Evansville: Locust Creek. This creek is always filled to the brim with Creek Chubs, and this is the time of year when they are all getting ready to spawn. My main goal of the day was to catch some small ones for bait on Pigeon Creek, but I was also hoping to hook into a spawning male. After filling my bait bucket with enough small creek chubs to last the day, I turned my attention to trying to catch a larger male. Before long, I set the hook into what I suspected to be a small Largemouth Bass, but turned out to be a large Creek Chub in full spawning attire. During spawning season, the males grow tubercles and in this case also took on the rusty orange color that adult creek chubs can have.

After happily catching my fair share of Creek Chubs, I packed up and drove to my favorite section of Pigeon Creek. After a long hike with a very heavy bait bucket, I set up my three rods in hopes of finding my first Flathead Catfish of the year. The bite was incredibly slow and the fish seemed to be remarkably skilled in hitting my bait and then instantly snagging my line around the debris on the bottom of the creek. But after an hour of frustration, one of my poles doubled over and the battle was on. I carefully worked the fish out of the log jam it tried to wrap itself in and was thrilled to see a Flathead Catfish finally break surface.

I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to try to catch one of the Gar that I kept seeing surfacing around me. I finally found one that was cruising right below the surface, and I quickly put a minnow on a treble hook and cast out in front of it. The Gar dashed forward at the minnow and then dived, and my instincts said to set the hook (but I’ve made that mistake enough times to know better). So, I let the gar swim with the minnow for about 45 seconds before setting the hook, hard. The hook set perfectly in the lower jaw and I was able to easily reel in the Gar. I was even more excited when I realized that this was actually a Spotted Gar, a species that I didn’t have on my list yet.

Toward the end of the month, I returned to [location name redacted again] to see if any new species had moved into it yet. I was happy to see some Gar spawning in the backwater creek and even a few Bowfin cruising around. Sadly, my ultralight setup was not ready for the challenge of one of these toothy critters. I switched my attention back to the panfish- hoping to find a Redspotted Sunfish in Evansville. Unfortunately, the closest population I have found is still in Winslow, Indiana. However, the creek still has a stable population of Bluegill, Warmouth, Green Sunfish, Redear Sunfish, Black Crappie, and Flier Sunfish.

I still hadn’t caught a decent Spotted Bass this year, so I headed to the river to try to change that. The boat launch at Angel Mounds has a fantastic current seam that always holds a few bass when the river is rising. I set up two catfish rods like usual, and then started tossing around a small white curl tail grub on my ultralight rod. It didn’t take long before I felt a bump and I set the hook into the first species of the day: a little Striped Bass.

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The next fish to fall victim to the lure was a Skipjack Herring, the first one I’ve found this year. I ended up catching two of them and keeping both as catfish bait for a later trip.

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After catching a handful of Striped Bass and White Bass, I finally had a hit that felt distinctive from the others. I set the hook and this one fought differently. A short fight later, I was holding my first half-decent Spotted Bass of the year.

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The bait rods started getting hits, but they kept managing to miss the hook. After multiple failed hook sets, I connected with one of the small Channel Catfish that were crowding this spot.

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This was a rare occasion where the Freshwater Drum were slower to find the bait than the catfish. But eventually, I stumbled across a small one.

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Because I was getting so many small bites, I decided to downsize my hook size. This quickly resulted in what most people around here refer to as a “river minnow”- or if you are into identifying fish (like I am) a Silver Chub. This was another exciting catch since it was a first for my species list!

Edited

The White Bass were getting active, so I couldn’t resist trying to mark off another item off my bucket list: catching a temperate bass on a fly rod. I tied on my last Clouser Minnow and got to work. It took a while, but finally my line twitched and I set the hook into the first of many White Bass.

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My success at fly fishing left me feeling accomplished, so I decided to explore some of the water upstream of the boat launch. I decided not to tempt my luck too far and only took my ultralight rod and a container of nightcrawlers. The real highlight of exploring this new stretch of water was hooking into a lovely little Longnose Gar.

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While I’ve enjoyed fishing the river, this has really been one of my best years fishing backwater creeks. I would highly suggest that any of you with access to places like this try exploring them. A lot of very cool, overlooked species are living here, and better yet, you usually know you are the only person who is fishing these spots. I will always pick these hidden backwater creeks over a trophy Largemouth Bass lake any day, and I hope you will consider giving it a try, too.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Lake Spillway Fishing

Most people go to Ferdinand State Forest with the purpose of fishing in the main lake. I am not one of those people. You’ll see me walk right beside the lake and down the dam wall and stop at the small creek formed by the spillway. I have been laughed at countless times for fishing in this little creek, but I have yet to be disappointed by it. It holds large numbers of chubs and bass in the spring and crappie and panfish through the summer and fall.  The lake only thawed out this week so the water levels were high and water was terribly muddy. But this pushed a lot of water through the overflow and had the creek at decent level. The set up was simple, an ice fishing float tied on 18 inches above a jig with a piece of night crawler. With a fairly decent current at the top of the creek, the fish were congregated around the edges of the deep pool. It seemed I was reeling in a fish every minute or two, they were all small (the largest being around 9 inches) but they all produced that kid like excitement of watching a float dance and then shoot underwater. My prize catch this round was a small Longear Sunfish, it was amazing how few panfish there are in the creek this time of year (of the 70 fish I caught in the creek only 4 were panfish). The most photogenic of today’s catches:6tag_200216-2213586tag_200216-2214306tag_200216-2215506tag_200216-2216286tag_200216-2216476tag_200216-221758

So next time you are exploring a new lake don’t forget to check for a spillway, because often times this is where a good number of fish will be congregated. Tight lines