November is a Fisherman’s Dream

I love fishing in all the seasons, each one holds something special that appeals to me. But I have always been partial to fall. The combination of the weather, the colors, and the purely ridiculous number of fish that can be caught make it an anglers dream. One of the things that is captivating to me most about fishing in the fall is the constant flux of the weather and water conditions. One day it can be in the 60’s with great water visibility, and then the next it’ll be in the 30’s muddy and rainy. I like the daily challenge and unpredictability of this season, it helps force me to test new tactics for fish and forces me to explore different methods of fishing than I am not already comfortable with. November has been a wildly successful month, I’ve been fortunate enough to get in a good amount of fishing in all sorts of locations, ranging from the Ohio River down to small public ponds.

It seems that my fall fishing always starts at Garvin Park, for some reason I’m still a sucker for the stocked trout. I would rather the funds being used for these fish be put into the native species for this area, but since I’m not in charge of making that decision I’ve decided to just go with it and enjoy the opportunity to catch them. Plus it is always a good excuse to break out the 5 weight fly rod.

Rainbow Trout on the Fly

Rainbow Trout on the Fly

The stocked Rainbow Trout don’t seem to be too smart and have been willing to bite almost anything that falls right in front of their faces. Early in November I was lucky enough to stumble across a feeding frenzy happening in the shallows. You could see small groups of trout hunting in the shallow water by the shore and as soon as anything touched the water they would all start attacking it. I was armed with my ultralight that day with a small jig and lost count of the number of trout I caught. It was actually such good fishing I ended up keeping my limit, a very rare thing for me to do (though I will admit this was mostly because they are stocked fish and can’t survive the summers so I don’t feel bad taking them).

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout

I caught a lot of trout in November, but one of my biggest goals was to capture some good images of these fish. Last year I was so excited to just be catching trout that I didn’t do them justice in the pictures I took. One of the images I was happiest with was an oddly proportioned Rainbow Trout, but the combination of the colors on the fish with the fall leaves in the background captured the season well.

Rainbow Trout

Humpback Rainbow Trout

But I can’t let all the attention go to these seasonal invaders of the lake, I was able to catch a number of the common species that call this lake their home. You can’t fish in the fall without enjoying how greedy bass get. I don’t usually spend much time bass fishing, much less at this park. But I figured with the way the fish were biting I may as well embrace it and managed a few above average from this lake.

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

One of the reasons I like the lake at Garvin Park is the large population of Warmouth that live there. The shallows are full submerged timber, the classic ambush point for this fish to hide in. I usually have a very difficult time hunting down Warmouth once it starts getting cold, so you can image how happy I was to still be finding them in the shallow structure.

Warmouth

Warmouth

No fishing trip at Garvin Park would ever be complete unless you accidentally caught a catfish. This tends to be the fish species people are most commonly fishing for here, and there doesn’t really seem to be any shortage of these little Channel Catfish.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

One thing I’ve always found interesting about this lake is the ratio of Bluegill to Redear Sunfish. For some reason a lot of these smaller urban lakes have really large populations of Bluegill, and very small populations of Redear Sunfish. And this lake follows that pattern, though I was lucky enough to manage to hook a few of them while jigging for trout.

Redear Sunfish

Redear Sunfish

As November started passing by I knew my window for wading Pigeon Creek was starting to close (and it did occasionally flood enough to be unsafe to wade). I know how fickle this creek can get once it gets truly cold so I wanted to make sure I spent some more time here before winter starts to set in. As you would expect with me I can’t go to a creek without microfishing, I wasn’t able to find any new species this month. But I was happy to see some familiar faces. I caught a ridiculous number of Emerald Shiners this month, with a much smaller number of Mimic Shiners mixed in. Occasionally a small catfish would find my bait first, which is always a pleasant surprise.

Mimic Shiner

Mimic Shiner

Emerald Shiner

Emerald Shiner

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

I still haven’t ever gotten over my obsession with sunfish, for some reason no matter what species I’m after I tend to return back to them. And Pigeon Creek is one of the places that I really enjoy fishing for them at, I like the added challenge that current gives. I have waded enough of this section of the creek to have a decent idea of where my best chances are to catch them at and have been lucky enough to catch a good number of fish. One of them being a surprisingly large Bluegill, he fought so hard I wasn’t really sure what I had hooked until I landed the fish.

Bluegill

Bluegill

One of the cool catches I stumbled across while wading for sunfish was the first Hybrid Sunfish I have ever caught from this creek. I figured they would be around, but in all the years I’ve fished here I had never managed to hook into one.

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

And the fish that always likes to steal the show has been still showing some surprisingly bright colors for this late in the year. The Longear Sunfish have become harder and harder to track down as the water temperatures have dropped, but each time I find one they seem to still be carrying some brilliant colors.

Longear Sunfish

Longear Sunfish

I suppose one thing I should point out at this point is that when I’m wading the creek I’m always using my ultralight rod rigged with 4 pound test line. So you can imagine my surprise to find a large drum on the end of my line while fishing for Bluegill. After putting up a hard fight, and using the current to its advantage I was lucky enough to be holding a gorgeous copper colored Freshwater Drum.

Freshwater Drum

Freshwater Drum

I really haven’t fished the Ohio River much since returning to Indiana, so I decided to dedicate one evening to fishing it. I took my usual approach to fishing the river, I found a good current break by a boat launch and set up my rods there. I quickly microfished up a few small Emerald Shiners to use as live bait. I cast those out to the deeper water on the edge of the current and let it drift into the calmer water and simply waited for a bite. It didn’t take long before the first fish bit and I was holding a lovely little White Bass.

White Bass

White Bass

As the sun started to set the bite started to pick up and I managed to catch my first Hybrid Striped Bass of the evening. I’ll be honest when I set the hook and reeled it in I didn’t really realize I had a fish on the other end of the line, I guess that was the downfall of using a slightly heavier river rod.

Hybrid Striped Bass

Hybrid Striped Bass

I think it should be no surprise that using this tactic also resulted in a few small Channel Catfish. I’ve found over the years that my luck with catfish at the river is mostly just bound to Channel Catfish. I still haven’t managed to catch my first Blue Catfish of the year…and I’m almost out of days in the year to make that happen.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

As it got dark the bite slowed down to a crawl but I didn’t want to give up until I had caught a few more fish. I caught a larger live bait and cast it back out and waited. As I was starting to get chilled to the bone my line twitched and I set the hook into the first Striped Bass of the evening. Nothing helps warm you up like catching a fish.

Striped Bass

Striped Bass

As I was microfishing for Emerald Shiners to use for bait I had the pleasant surprise of stumbling across a number of very small Freshwater Drum. I even broke my personal smallest Freshwater Drum (a thing only a true microfishing nerd would say). It was cool to get to see them at this size, I usually find them when they are at least hand sized.

Freshwater Drum

Freshwater Drum

No fall fishing is complete without visiting the State Hospital Park to do some crappie fishing (though I feel like I’d say that in about any season, simply because I really enjoy the challenge of crappie fishing there). Plus this lake produces some of the prettiest White Crappie I have ever seen.

White Crappie

White Crappie

I’ve fished this lake almost all of my life, and it still seems to bring the occasional surprise. This time it was in the form of large Golden Shiner! I have never once seen a shiner in this lake, much less one this size. So that was a very exciting catch, though it will be something I’ll be keeping my eye out for. I’d be curious to know if this is a lone escapee from a bait bucket or if there is an established population.

Golden Shiner

Golden Shiner

One of the highlights from November was getting the opportunity to fish a private lake that sees very little fishing pressure. We were asked by the landlord to thin the crappie population, which was something my fishing partner and I were more than willing to do for him. The cool thing about this lake is not only does it have Black Crappie in it, but it has Blacknose Crappie in it. This fish is the result of a recessive gene and is the only location I’ve found with them in Indiana so far.

Blacknose Crappie

Blacknose Crappie

Plus this lake has some of the most aggressive Hybrid Sunfish I’ve ever seen, and with the lack of fishing pressure there is a good number of very large ones. This one was aggressive enough to attack a lipless crankbait!

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

I think we lost count of the number of crappie we caught that day, which is always a sign of a good time. We are both fairly stubborn people and we decided we were going to catch at least one fish on the fly rod even though it was cold and windy. To our surprise we were able to cast to deep enough water to reach the crappie. I stuck with a simple streamer pattern and found some very willing Black Crappie (a few that ended up being part of a Thanksgiving fish fry).

Black Crappie

Black Crappie

I know fall is starting to come to an end when Blue Grass FWA closes down for duck hunting. There was a one week break in the middle of duck season where the lakes were open to fishing and took advantage of it, knowing it would likely be February before I could fish there again. I didn’t have any big goals going there, I knew the conditions were going to make the bite difficult. But I really just wanted to catch a Longear Sunfish and then I would be happy. My first stop didn’t result in a Longear Sunfish, but rather a very aggressive Hybrid Sunfish.

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

I switched over to microfishing tactics at this spot thinking maybe I could catch a juvenile Longear Sunfish. Sadly this didn’t happen, but to my surprise a Green Sunfish found my tiny bait and managed to stay hooked! These little guys have a tendency to either brake my leaders or shake my tiny hooks.

Green Sunfish

Green Sunfish

While exploring around for potential spots for Longear Sunfish I came across the largest group of Blackstripe Topminnows I have ever seen. Without fear of exaggeration there were easily over 100 grouped up together in a shallow stretch of water that connects the lakes together. I couldn’t help but take advantage of this and catch a couple to get a good picture of the species for my records.

Blackstripe Topminnow

Blackstripe Topminnow

At my final stop of the day I finally found the habitat I was looking for and found the fish that I was after. The water was cold and this little guy didn’t have the brightest colors, but that didn’t matter to me. I was just happy to have found the fish I was after and being able to say farewell to Blue Grass FWA on a high note until the spring.

Longear Sunfish

As you can see my November has been a mixed bag of a little bit of everything. And honestly that is what makes fishing so much fun to me. I like that this season doesn’t let me get in the rut of fishing one specific way for a specific species. It gives that extra bit of encouragement to get out and try different styles of fishing at different places. I hope you all have been getting out and enjoying this last bit of fall before winter sets in.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

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2016 Year in Review

2016 has been one of my best fishing years yet and I thought it would be fun to do a quick review of the best fishing trips of the year. I caught a record number of fish this year and managed to bump my species list up 45 different types of fish!

I thought a good place to start would be with some of the best bass I caught this year. The first big fish I caught was during early spring, while I was fishing for crappie. I wasn’t really expecting to catch any big fish that day; I was fishing with an ultralight rod with 4 lb test line, hoping to get a limit of crappie. But while jigging a 1.5 in fluke, something much larger engulfed my lure. Luckily, the water was cold and the fish was a little sluggish, so I was able to carefully work it out of the fallen tree it was hidden in. As you can see, I was pretty excited to catch this 5 lb 9 oz beauty!

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The next big bass I came across was during prespawn. I was exploring new places to fish and came across a series of beaver ponds in one of my favorite federal wildlife areas. I found a shallow cove with an old abandoned beaver dam and knew that at some point the big fish would have to move from the deep water to spawn in the shallow area. I fished this spot religiously for a few weeks and caught a lot of fish in the 2-3 lb range, but I just couldn’t connect with a big fish. After a few weeks, I was starting to give up on my mission, but then I struck gold: a 6 lb 6 oz tank of a bass.

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After this fish, I really just started focusing on catching numbers instead of size. But as many of us know, once you catch enough fish you are bound to catch a few big fish, too. Throughout early spring, I got hooked on catching fish on top water frogs and caught a ton of little fish on them. But one day, right before a big storm front pushed through, I fished one of the many public ponds close to school. I was really just hoping to catch a couple little fish before the rain started. But today held something different in store: right as the wind was starting to pick up, a big fish smashed the surface after my frog but totally missed it. I twitched the frog a few more times and it smashed the frog again, this time taking the frog under. I set the hook so hard I lost my footing and slid down the bank into the pond. I fought the fish while standing knee deep in water and landed the biggest fish I had ever seen in this lake. My scale put this fish at 6 lb 1 oz, but I’ll be honest: I don’t think I really buy that number.

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The last fish was by no means a monster, but it was one of my favorites of the year because it was a great trip with a close friend. I had always heard rumors about how good the fishing was at Sugar Ridge FWA, but the first lake we fished was full of stunted fish. I was a little disappointed at first, but this FWA has multiple lakes, so we switched to a new lake. We didn’t catch a lot in this lake, but all the fish we caught were quality.

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While I did catch some nice bass this year, I really focused more on panfish than I ever have before. I started in the spring like I usually do, with a lot of crappie fishing. I’m usually more of a catch-and-release fisherman, but this year I actually harvested some my catches. One of my best trips was on a perfect, cold, rainy day. The crappie bite was crazy- it seemed like on every cast I would hook into a quality Black Crappie. Indiana has a really large crappie limit, so I chose not to take a full limit, but I caught enough for a few meals.

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The best White Crappie I caught this year was (oddly enough) while I was doing some bass fishing. I launched my little, inflatable kayak into a beaver pond in hopes of some big bass. Strangely, instead of the bass I was hoping for, I actually hooked into my biggest White Crappie of the year.

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I also spent a lot of time this year trying to break my personal best for Warmouth. I know this isn’t typically a fish people care much for, but I think they are one of the most underrated panfish out there. My hunt this year was very successful: I landed some of the biggest Warmouth I have ever seen in Indiana. None of my fish were record fish for my state, but as far as I was concerned, they were trophy fish.

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One of my favorite catches this year was a Flier Sunfish. I tend to catch a couple of these each year in the Ohio River flood plains, but this year I wanted to catch my first one on an artificial lure. And I actually succeeded! I also discovered after releasing this fish that Indiana’s record Flier is only 3.5 oz, so I think next year I am going to try to break this.

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I caught the usual Bluegill, Longear, and Redear Sunfish throughout the summer. They stayed shallow for most of the year, so my 5 weight fly rod was the weapon of choice to target most of these fish.

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The prize fish I caught this year was my first ever Redspotted Sunfish! I know they are common in most areas, but I am right at the edge of their native range, so they really aren’t a common catch for me. The best part was that I caught it on one of my homemade jigs.

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As you’d expect, I also spent a lot of time fishing the Ohio River. This was probably my worst year for catfish because I spent more time fishing lures than cut-bait in the river. But I did manage to catch the three main catfish species from the Ohio River. The biggest catfish I caught this year was this Blue Catfish during the spring flooding, but I also caught the odd Flathead Catfish and a lot of little Channel Catfish.

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I seem to catch one Smallmouth Buffalo a year, and this year I actually had a decent camera with me so that you all could see it. These are always one of my favorite fish to catch, and one of these days I’m going to figure out how to catch them regularly.

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And if you’ve ever fished the Ohio River, you know there is never any shortage of Freshwater Drum there. And I caught a LOT of them this year! None of them were particularly big, but they always break the silence on slow fishing days.

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On one of my rare night-fishing trips, I broke my personal best for Longnose Gar. I got very lucky with this fish because I don’t tend to fish with steel leaders.

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Every year, there seems to be about a two-week window where the river conditions are right to catch Sauger from the bank. And this year, I actually managed to guess the right day to find where they were schooled up. Still no big fish, but this was the first year I was able to capture a high-quality picture of these gorgeous fish.

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I even managed a rare Ohio River Smallmouth Bass this year (well, rare for how south I am). I’ve caught a whopping 3 of these out of this river for as long as I have fished it. This one was easily the smallest one I’ve ever caught, but it was also one of the prettiest.

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The summer brought the usual run of Striped Bass and Hybrid Striped Bass. I tried my hardest to catch one of these fish on my fly rod, but that just wasn’t in the cards this year. But I did catch more of these fish than I could keep track of on my spinning rod.

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I rarely target Spotted Bass because I don’t have many good access sites where they are common. But there is one rock wall by a public boat launch that tends to hold one or two Spotted Bass, so I went out with my ultralight rod on a mission to catch one. Oddly enough, I hooked into one on my very first cast at this spot (after this fish, I couldn’t seem to find another Spotted Bass for the life of me).

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I spent less time in the Ohio River flood plains due to the heavy course load I took this semester, but I did manage one adventure back into some of flooded areas and hooked my only Bowfin for this year. I’m proud to report that this year I even manage to not get injured while handling it (last year one of these put a hook right through my hand).

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This year, I even hooked into a few Rainbow Trout! It’s been years since I have been lucky enough to even see one of these fish, so to actually be able to fish for them was enough to make my year. To make it even better, I even caught my first trout on my fly rod!

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One of the most surprising catches I had this year was a Koi from a local park pond. I was hoping to catch a little Common Carp, but this fish was far more exciting than my target.

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While exploring a little drainage ditch for Creek Chubs, I caught my first Grass Carp ever (not the size I was expecting my first Grass Carp to be, but it was a Grass Carp none the less).

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On a quick trip to Los Angeles, I added a good number of fish to my species list. I fished from a few public piers and managed to catch some Barred Sand Bass, Kelp Bass, California Scorpionfish, California Lizardfish, Pacific Mackerel, and Queenfish.

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This was a fantastic year filled with some great trips with some phenomenal people. I hope that you were all able to spend some time out on the water with the people you care about and catch a few memorial fish. I hope 2017 is just as fishy as 2016!

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Adventures on Pigeon Creek

Late summer has always been one of my favorite times of year to go creek fishing, and this year has been no exception. By this point in the year the water levels have dropped too far to be able to navigate in a kayak so bank fishing is the best option. My favorite way to approach fishing a creek is to put bait on two rods and a lure on the other.

I always like to fish a deep stretch right after some shallow rapids because these places tend to trap fish. I hiked my way to the first spot that had these features, and quickly hooked into a few fish. The first fish that fell for the inline spinner was a gorgeous little Shortnose Gar

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Not long after that I little Hybrid Striped Bass took the spinner. This one hit right on at the shade line from the trees.

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After that little fish the action slowed down, but I did managed to tempt a few Freshwater Drum with some nightcrawlers.

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I switched spots to a bend in the creek after about a half hour with out a bite. As soon as my bait touched the water an aggressive Longear Sunfish took my worm. This has to be one of the prettiest Longear Sunfish I have ever caught.

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At this point I was simply amazed I hadn’t hooked into any catfish so I moved further downstream to a well known log jam. I suspended my bait about a foot above a half ounce sinker and bounced this rig along the bottom with the current. This method quickly enticed a little Channel Catfish.

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At this point I was mostly out of bait and the temperature was reaching the upper 90’s so I decided to call it quits. I was proud of all the fish I caught, and I was especially excited to land a gar (it was been a few months since I’ve gotten one all the way to the bank to photograph). Hopefully I get a chance to fish Pigeon Creek again before the fall leaves make it too difficult to fish.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Exploring Yellowwood State Forest

This trip occurred on August 5th, 2016

Lately, I have been on the hunt for new places to fish. This led me to Yellowwood State Forest. My online research indicated that the famous Bluegill lake there had been destroyed by logging, but I wanted to see for myself. Old surveys suggested that this lake used to have Yellow Perch (a species I’ve always wanted to catch), so the 2-hour drive was pretty justifiable to me. I was also particularly curious about this lake because I couldn’t find any real information about it dated after 2011, so I figured it was time for someone to do a write up about how the fishing is. So on August 5th I got up way too early and drove my way up to the campground.

I started out fishing at the Jackson Creek trailhead and fished off the boat launch there. I quickly found some small Largemouth Bass sitting right off of an isolated grass patch.

 

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I then switched over to try to catch some panfish. It quickly became evident that all of the panfish close to the boat launch were very small, but the diversity in the species raised my hopes that I could find a Yellow Perch.

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I wasn’t catching anything new, so I drove over to the spillway on the south end of the lake to see what kind of fish inhabited that area. There were hundreds of small Bluegill in the spillway, so there were a few decent Largemouth Bass enjoying the easy prey.

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I could see a few other species in this area that I wanted to try to catch. The water was so clear I could see Black Crappie, Smallmouth Buffalo, Northern Hog Sucker and Common Carp. I was quickly able to tempt a crappie, but I couldn’t keep any bait in the water long enough to tempt any other species before the Bluegill would eat it.

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It was starting to get late, so I headed back to the campground to make sure everything was set up before it got dark. After I was all set up, I walked down to the lake to see if I could find any other fish. I ended up tempting a few small Largemouth Bass right off the weed line.

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Stocking reports said that this lake had a large population of Channel Catfish, so I cast out a few baits and waited as the sun went down. It didn’t take long before a catfish hit, but I couldn’t seem to find any of the bigger fish.

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But after the sun went down, a few of the bigger Shellcrackers went shallow and were biting right on the edge of the weed line.

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With that last fish, I decided to call it a night. But first thing in the morning, I started exploring the coves on the lake and found some Bluegill still on beds. It took some time, but I was finally able to tempt the biggest one to bite.

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I rented a jon boat so that I could paddle my way up the lake to where Jackson Creek flows in. There, I found a log jam that looked like it could hold some decent fish. I started by tossing a finesse worm, and immediately hooked into a large Redear Sunfish.

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I quickly caught a decent-sized Warmouth and a small Largemouth Bass.

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It became clear that this lake’s reputation of having big panfish was still pretty accurate. So I tied on a small jig and tipped it with small pieces of worms… and had an absolute blast catching these fish.

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After catching some nice Redear Sunfish, I realized how foolish I was for not bringing a cooler to keep a few. But then I got distracted by a couple of beautiful Longear Sunfish and started targeting them instead.

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I kept seeing a fish move around on the edge of the log jam, so I tossed a jig to it and a greedy Warmouth quickly gobbled it up.

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After a while, the wind started picking up so I paddled back to shore and found some more small Largemouth Bass sitting on any irregularities in the weed line.

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I also did a little bit of micro fishing before leaving. I was able to find what I think are Freckled Madtoms (or possibly a juvenile Yellow Bullhead) and some larger Blackstripe Topminnows.

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My final impressions of Yellowwood State Forest: there are still some nice panfish that can be found, but as far as I could see, there is no longer a population of Yellow Perch. I also wasn’t able to find any decent size bass, but this might have been more because I’m not a very confident deep water angler. The lake seems to have a decent number of catfish, but again I wasn’t able to find any decent size fish. Regardless, I had an absolute blast fishing this lake and I highly suggest giving it a try for yourself!

Tight lines,

-Isaac

 

 

Exploring Ferdinand State Forest

I’ve fished Ferdinand State Forest a few times when I was younger with my father, but these trips have always focused on catching Largemouth Bass and I’ve always wanted to know what else lives out in this park. So Friday after work I started packing up all of my fishing and camping gear so that I could leave first thing Saturday morning. When I go on trips like this I always like to set myself a goal to help keep me motivated, this trip I decided that my goal would be to catch 10 different species. Saturday morning I got up with the sun, packed the last of my food and jumped in my suv to start the drive. I got to the park before the ranger at the station did and was able to secure the best camping location in the whole park. After struggling with the tent for a half hour my campsite was set up and I unloaded the rods to do a little fishing.

I started by exploring the overflow creek from the lake and tried to target some of the gar that kept surfacing. After many failed hook sets I gave up on that quest and put on my rubber boots and started microfishing my way down the creek (well as close to microfishing as you can get with a size 22 hook). My efforts were quickly rewarded with a lovely Blackstripe Topminnow.

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At the next pool I was happy to find a large number of creek chubs.

After working through a good number of chubs I found what I think is a Striped Shiner

At this point I switched over to the top lake and took the canoe out to target a few evening largemouth. It didn’t take long to find a Largemouth Bass willing to hit a top water lure.

As sunset approached I set out to find some firewood and get dinner ready. I had hoped to fish for catfish once the sun had set, but after making supper I was surprisingly tired so I went ahead and settled down in my tent for the night.

Once again I woke up as the sun was just starting to come up, I decided to go back to the over flow creek and see if I could find a few more fish species before it got too hot. I started by jigging around the rocks and as I was hoping was able to tempt quite a few Warmouth.

I then started tossing the jig into some shallower water that was at the back end of the pool I was fishing was able to find a few very colorful Green Sunfish

But I had heard rumors of that this overflow was home to some crappie and I just couldn’t seem to tempt them. Then I had the idea to start casting as far up the inflow pipe as I could. Surprisingly I started catching a lot of bluegill from this spot.

After working through a lot of bluegill I was incredibly excited to hook into a small Black Crappie (I may or may not have cheered when I landed this fish).

I tossed out a rod with some cutbait with hopes of a gar again, but this time I was lucky enough to hook into what I think is a Yellow Bullhead (I honestly have the hardest time telling the bullheads apart)

After this fish I returned to jigging, I found a small submerged tree branch and tossed my jig into it. I was incredibly excited to see this little Redear Sunfish come out of it.

The last thing I wanted to include were a few of the strange catches I had as I was exploring the forest. The first is the very oddly colored Warmouth, at first I thought it was a rock bass but it appears to have the wrong number of spines on the anal fin.

And while I was micro fishing I was very surprised to catch a frog in between the tadpole and the froglet stage!

Micro Fishing Bluegrass FWA

To start this out, I know this is going to be a post that really only relates to a very small number of anglers and that this kind of fishing goes against the typical fishing mentality. The first thing you need to know is what micro fishing is: basically micro fishing is where you try to catch the smallest fish possible on a hook.

My go to setup for micro fishing is my 5 wt Redington fly rod and Mustad size 22 hooks. I tie the hook onto my fly line and tip the tiny hook with a very small piece of white soft plastic from old lures. This gives the fish a specific place on the hook to strike and increases the hook up ratio significantly.FOT9603

The easiest place to target micro fish on lakes seems to be at boat launches, since it provides safety from predatory fish in the deeper water. However, it seems that you have to work through a lot of average size panfish before you can start targeting the actual micro fish. The first fish you tend to catch in these spots are more aggressive, in my case Green Sunfish.

After the Green Sunfish got spooked from my spot the next aggressive fish started hitting my fly: Redear Sunfish.

The last species you have to worry about is the occasional Largemouth Bass that will come up into the shallower water.

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Now the fish actually start to become micro, the easiest small fish to start catching is the bluegill. The fry tend to stay in the shallows and are fairly aggressive and will fight each other over which gets to eat the fly first.

If you start fishing in the very shallowest part of the water you can catch some of the truly small species. I focused my attention on trying to catch my first Blackstripe Topminnow. Turns out they are very easy to catch once you have downsized your hook to a 22.
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The last species that I was able to find was the Western Mosquitofish. This is a very common fish to find in the shallows, however due to their very small mouth they are one of the more challenging micro fish that I have caught so far.WP_20160702_18_29_41_Pro

I know this post will seem strange to a lot of anglers since this goes completely against the “catch the biggest fish possible” mentality. But I find that micro fishing is incredibly relaxing and very intriguing when you are trying to figure out how to identify the fish that you catch.

So give it a try, I’d love to know what you think about this very different form of fishing.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

 

Sometimes It Is Numbers Over Size

I made a trip out to Scales Lake in Boonville Indiana with the intention of catching as many bass as I could. The park opens at 7 but because I am not the best at planning I arrive there at 8. After a little confusion renting a boat, I launched and made my first stop at the life guard stand. I know this spot gets a lot of pressure so instead of throwing a jig into it, I tossed a wacky worm and let it fall slowly and twitched it a few times. I pulled 3 little bass off this feature within the first few minutes of fishing.

The rest of the day I focused my attention fishing the coves this lake has. I saw few fish hitting top water in the shallows so I tied on a hollow body frog and started tossing it around. The fish weren’t confidently taking the lure, so I tied on a buzz frog and the bass started hitting it instantly. Out of curiosity I tied on a popping frog and the fish hit that as well.

As the day got hotter it be came apparent very quickly that they were not interested in top water any more. One of my favorite patterns to fish during the hottest days of summer is to fish a lizard that has its tail dyed chartreuse and fishing it right on the edge of thick hydrilla. The fish were unquestionably honed in on this pattern today. I fished them weightless and on Texas rigs and the fish seemed equally interested regardless of the weight.

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At this point it was about 94 degrees so I decided to call it a day. I caught 30 bass from the jon boat and the largest fish of the day was 15 inches. I have still yet to find a large bass in this lake, but today was a great day and I had an absolute blast.

Tight lines,

Isaac

Exploring Sugar Ridge

I like to think that I have fished a good number of lakes in this area, but before today I never had an opportunity to fish Sugar Ridge. I had always heard that the pits there didn’t have very good shore fishing and I had never tried taking the kayak out there. But today was different; a buddy and I planned to meet there and fish from his jon boat for the day.WP_20160530_17_08_36_ProI arrived before my friend did and got to choose the pit that we were fishing, so naturally I choose Arm Pit. My friend was being slow getting here so I started exploring around to try to find a spot to fish from the bank. Most of the spots accessible from the bank were very shallow and had lots a weeds. But I found a creek that was flowing out of the lake so I hiked out to it and started fishing it from the bank. As expected I found a lot of panfish in this creek and was able to catch them on worms, jigs and spinners. I was hoping to catch a bass out of this creek but I just couldn’t seem to find one. WP_20160530_13_33_16_ProWP_20160530_14_01_31_ProWP_20160530_13_42_46_ProWP_20160530_13_47_24_ProWP_20160530_14_25_13_ProAt this point my friend arrived and we tossed his jon boat in the lake and started fishing. We actually started fishing the lake beside Arm Pit, it was super clear and you could see bass all over it. These fish all seemed to be smart and we couldn’t tempt any of them to hit lures. We then dragged the boat over to Arm Pit and started fishing it. I fished a finesse worm rigged wacky style in this lake and targeted all of the submerged trees and any place that had a slow transition from shallow to the deeper water.WP_20160530_16_32_54_ProWP_20160530_15_51_50_ProWP_20160530_16_22_33_ProWP_20160530_16_22_52_ProWP_20160530_16_35_36_ProWP_20160530_16_41_43_ProAfter covering a lot of water we hooked into some nice fish and even managed to sight fish for a few cruising fish (I am such a sucker for seeing a fish hit a lure). The biggest fish of the day hit 4 lb even  and caught about 30 fish total.

I hope your Memorial Day was as good as mine,

Tight lines,

-Isaac

My Favorite Time Of Year

April has always been my favorite time of the year to go fishing. The water is slowly warming up and the fish are starting to hit more consistently. What I really love about this time of year is that the fish are hitting different patterns every day. I thoroughly enjoy the challenge of figuring out what the fish are hitting on every time I go out. During the summer it is easy to get in the rut of tossing the same lures over and over again at the same spot that you caught a fish at last. But in the spring the fish will hit a lure one day and then be in a completely different part of the lake and honed in on a different pattern before you know it.

This is the time of year that I like to take out new baits and test out new tactics for Largemouth Bass. I have had days where I will fish a lake and get top water hits for hours, then come back the next day to find that none of the fish are in the shallows and then proceed to fish tube jigs and find quality fish all day. It is amazing how quickly the fish change how they are feeding, and what color they prefer. So far this year I have focused on a few lures: frogs, tube jigs, flukes, worms and crankbaits. With these five lures it is hard to find a situation where you can’t entice a few fish to strike. The pictures below show a few of the fish that I have been finding while exploring some new lakes with these tactics.

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The other nice part of this time of year is how easy it is to find Crappie. There are many lakes in my town that are strictly bank fishing, and unless the Crappie go shallow it is extremely hard to catch them. But with the fish being in the middle of spawn it is easy to find them; just find structure and slowly drag a small tube jig across it and before you know it a Crappie will attack it. I haven’t found the size Crappie I’m looking for yet, but I am finding the numbers each time I’m out.

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My last trip out I started to see the Bluegill and Redear Sunfish bedding up in the shallows, it is about time to break out the fly rod and start throwing some top water flies at these fish again. May is just starting and this is always when the fishing really starts to pick up in Indiana.

I hope your spring is treating you with just as many fish

-Isaac

Early Season Frog Fishing

I was at the tackle shop over the winter and saw Lunkerhunt’s Pocket Frog for the first time. I had zero hesitation purchasing it; I had been searching for a good small frog for quite a while. This frog had my favorite features: Moving legs, a small profile and double hooks.

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The reason I love small frogs like this is that it gives me the ability to fish them on monofilament line and still have a fairly decent hook up ratio. Since I don’t have any intentions of fishing a small frog on pads or heavy weeds I can get away with using a smaller and lighter line.

The temperatures finally warmed up to the mid 60’s for a few consecutive days and the bass have moved back into the shallows. The lake I planned to fish this in is heavily pressured, so the popular crankbaits and soft plastics are usually a bust. Top water is usually a safe bet in early spring, but the large number of fallen trees make it difficult to fish anything with exposed hooks. I tied on the Pocket Frog and started working the shallows, and it didn’t take more than a minute to have my first strike. I had set my drag too loose and the hook didn’t stick, so I adjusted my drag and kept working around the lake. The bite was consistent after that, reeling in one fish after another. I even managed to tempt fish up out of 10 ft deep pocket. It was clear that the fish had never seen this lure before and had zero hesitation striking at.

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In southern Indiana most people claim that frog season doesn’t start until late May or early June, but they ignore a simple fact: if you can hear frogs croaking, it is already frog season. Most people disregard frogs as a good tactic to fish weedless water, but they are missing a fantastic, underutilized bait. Most fish haven’t had this lure thrown at them, and lures that have very natural action like these entice the most aggressive bites in the spring.

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An average hour session fishing this lake with all the other lures in my tackle bag produces 6 fish, as you can see by the pictures I had no trouble surpassing that number with this lure. This is a new tactic for me, and it is one I will undoubtedly be using much more during the early spring.

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I encourage you to give this a try on pressured lakes, I was amazed with the results it produced for me.

As always, tight lines

-Isaac