Adventures on Pigeon Creek

Late summer has always been one of my favorite times of year to go creek fishing, and this year has been no exception. By this point in the year the water levels have dropped too far to be able to navigate in a kayak so bank fishing is the best option. My favorite way to approach fishing a creek is to put bait on two rods and a lure on the other.

I always like to fish a deep stretch right after some shallow rapids because these places tend to trap fish. I hiked my way to the first spot that had these features, and quickly hooked into a few fish. The first fish that fell for the inline spinner was a gorgeous little Shortnose Gar

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Not long after that I little Hybrid Striped Bass took the spinner. This one hit right on at the shade line from the trees.

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After that little fish the action slowed down, but I did managed to tempt a few Freshwater Drum with some nightcrawlers.

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I switched spots to a bend in the creek after about a half hour with out a bite. As soon as my bait touched the water an aggressive Longear Sunfish took my worm. This has to be one of the prettiest Longear Sunfish I have ever caught.

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At this point I was simply amazed I hadn’t hooked into any catfish so I moved further downstream to a well known log jam. I suspended my bait about a foot above a half ounce sinker and bounced this rig along the bottom with the current. This method quickly enticed a little Channel Catfish.

Catfish from pigeon creeeek

At this point I was mostly out of bait and the temperature was reaching the upper 90’s so I decided to call it quits. I was proud of all the fish I caught, and I was especially excited to land a gar (it was been a few months since I’ve gotten one all the way to the bank to photograph). Hopefully I get a chance to fish Pigeon Creek again before the fall leaves make it too difficult to fish.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Exploring Ferdinand State Forest

I’ve fished Ferdinand State Forest a few times when I was younger with my father, but these trips have always focused on catching Largemouth Bass and I’ve always wanted to know what else lives out in this park. So Friday after work I started packing up all of my fishing and camping gear so that I could leave first thing Saturday morning. When I go on trips like this I always like to set myself a goal to help keep me motivated, this trip I decided that my goal would be to catch 10 different species. Saturday morning I got up with the sun, packed the last of my food and jumped in my suv to start the drive. I got to the park before the ranger at the station did and was able to secure the best camping location in the whole park. After struggling with the tent for a half hour my campsite was set up and I unloaded the rods to do a little fishing.

I started by exploring the overflow creek from the lake and tried to target some of the gar that kept surfacing. After many failed hook sets I gave up on that quest and put on my rubber boots and started microfishing my way down the creek (well as close to microfishing as you can get with a size 22 hook). My efforts were quickly rewarded with a lovely Blackstripe Topminnow.

Blackstripe Top Minnow

At the next pool I was happy to find a large number of creek chubs.

After working through a good number of chubs I found what I think is a Striped Shiner

At this point I switched over to the top lake and took the canoe out to target a few evening largemouth. It didn’t take long to find a Largemouth Bass willing to hit a top water lure.

As sunset approached I set out to find some firewood and get dinner ready. I had hoped to fish for catfish once the sun had set, but after making supper I was surprisingly tired so I went ahead and settled down in my tent for the night.

Once again I woke up as the sun was just starting to come up, I decided to go back to the over flow creek and see if I could find a few more fish species before it got too hot. I started by jigging around the rocks and as I was hoping was able to tempt quite a few Warmouth.

I then started tossing the jig into some shallower water that was at the back end of the pool I was fishing was able to find a few very colorful Green Sunfish

But I had heard rumors of that this overflow was home to some crappie and I just couldn’t seem to tempt them. Then I had the idea to start casting as far up the inflow pipe as I could. Surprisingly I started catching a lot of bluegill from this spot.

After working through a lot of bluegill I was incredibly excited to hook into a small Black Crappie (I may or may not have cheered when I landed this fish).

I tossed out a rod with some cutbait with hopes of a gar again, but this time I was lucky enough to hook into what I think is a Yellow Bullhead (I honestly have the hardest time telling the bullheads apart)

After this fish I returned to jigging, I found a small submerged tree branch and tossed my jig into it. I was incredibly excited to see this little Redear Sunfish come out of it.

The last thing I wanted to include were a few of the strange catches I had as I was exploring the forest. The first is the very oddly colored Warmouth, at first I thought it was a rock bass but it appears to have the wrong number of spines on the anal fin.

And while I was micro fishing I was very surprised to catch a frog in between the tadpole and the froglet stage!

Exploring Sugar Ridge

I like to think that I have fished a good number of lakes in this area, but before today I never had an opportunity to fish Sugar Ridge. I had always heard that the pits there didn’t have very good shore fishing and I had never tried taking the kayak out there. But today was different; a buddy and I planned to meet there and fish from his jon boat for the day.WP_20160530_17_08_36_ProI arrived before my friend did and got to choose the pit that we were fishing, so naturally I choose Arm Pit. My friend was being slow getting here so I started exploring around to try to find a spot to fish from the bank. Most of the spots accessible from the bank were very shallow and had lots a weeds. But I found a creek that was flowing out of the lake so I hiked out to it and started fishing it from the bank. As expected I found a lot of panfish in this creek and was able to catch them on worms, jigs and spinners. I was hoping to catch a bass out of this creek but I just couldn’t seem to find one. WP_20160530_13_33_16_ProWP_20160530_14_01_31_ProWP_20160530_13_42_46_ProWP_20160530_13_47_24_ProWP_20160530_14_25_13_ProAt this point my friend arrived and we tossed his jon boat in the lake and started fishing. We actually started fishing the lake beside Arm Pit, it was super clear and you could see bass all over it. These fish all seemed to be smart and we couldn’t tempt any of them to hit lures. We then dragged the boat over to Arm Pit and started fishing it. I fished a finesse worm rigged wacky style in this lake and targeted all of the submerged trees and any place that had a slow transition from shallow to the deeper water.WP_20160530_16_32_54_ProWP_20160530_15_51_50_ProWP_20160530_16_22_33_ProWP_20160530_16_22_52_ProWP_20160530_16_35_36_ProWP_20160530_16_41_43_ProAfter covering a lot of water we hooked into some nice fish and even managed to sight fish for a few cruising fish (I am such a sucker for seeing a fish hit a lure). The biggest fish of the day hit 4 lb even  and caught about 30 fish total.

I hope your Memorial Day was as good as mine,

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Lake Spillway Fishing

Most people go to Ferdinand State Forest with the purpose of fishing in the main lake. I am not one of those people. You’ll see me walk right beside the lake and down the dam wall and stop at the small creek formed by the spillway. I have been laughed at countless times for fishing in this little creek, but I have yet to be disappointed by it. It holds large numbers of chubs and bass in the spring and crappie and panfish through the summer and fall.  The lake only thawed out this week so the water levels were high and water was terribly muddy. But this pushed a lot of water through the overflow and had the creek at decent level. The set up was simple, an ice fishing float tied on 18 inches above a jig with a piece of night crawler. With a fairly decent current at the top of the creek, the fish were congregated around the edges of the deep pool. It seemed I was reeling in a fish every minute or two, they were all small (the largest being around 9 inches) but they all produced that kid like excitement of watching a float dance and then shoot underwater. My prize catch this round was a small Longear Sunfish, it was amazing how few panfish there are in the creek this time of year (of the 70 fish I caught in the creek only 4 were panfish). The most photogenic of today’s catches:6tag_200216-2213586tag_200216-2214306tag_200216-2215506tag_200216-2216286tag_200216-2216476tag_200216-221758

So next time you are exploring a new lake don’t forget to check for a spillway, because often times this is where a good number of fish will be congregated. Tight lines

Winter Catfish: Flooded Creek Adventure

Winter fishing has always been a little bit of a mystery to me. But as an angler, there is one thing that no matter what time of year it is tells me that I should be fishing: Flood conditions. The NOAA chart had the Ohio River just dropping below flood today. Ideally you would fish as the water rises or when the water reaches its maximum level, but this trip proves that fish will still bite even as the water levels start to drop.

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I set up in between two sharp bends on Pigeon Creek, this sudden change in flow creates a deep bowl in the creek bed. When the creek floods, this results in a roughly 30 foot deep pocket that has a slightly buffered current. This creates a safe place for bait fish to school up, in turn bringing actively feeding catfish. The map below shows the location that I fished.

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It was too cold for me to comfortably try to cast net bait fish, so I settled for some nightcrawlers. I tied 2 ounces of lead on my line and then created a dropper loop a 1 and 1/2 foot above that. I attached a circle hook to the loop and cast the bait 10 feet out into the creek. The bite was very slow,  having a nibble once every 30 minutes or so. Luckily my patience paid of with 2 small catfish.

Fishing flooded pigeon for cats

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I missed a large number of bites, but for a short and very cold trip I was happy to have landed 2 fish.Fishing this creek only gets hard and harder as the water drops and cools down further, so soon I will back trying to figure out how to catch fish in the Ohio River during the winter. But until then, I will stay grateful for every little catfish that I get lucky enough to catch from this creek.

A Rainy Days Fishing

A large storm front was moving through today, leading to 7 hours of rain. Seeing this forecast I though the fishing would be incredible (like any good fisherman any excuse to go fishing is a valid excuse). The rain was supposed to start about noon, so I quickly found a spot to fish at and not be miserable. I ended up at Pigeon Creek for many reasons: Setting up under the Diamond Avenue bridge would give me cover from the rain, the creek is surrounded by woods so there would be a little bit of a wind break and there storm drain outlet there so I thought the fish would be feeding on everything that was getting washed out of it.

I’ve spent a lot of time on this creek and have found 2 lures that tend to catch fish pretty consistently: bucktail jigs and inline spinners. This spot is littered with snags, so I choose to work a little higher in the water column working a small rooster tail. On the third cast I caught a small bass. Shortly after this the rain started and the bite totally stopped. I saw a few small schools of shad swimming in the shallows, but there was not a single sign of any other fish. I didn’t have a single bite on lures, minnows or nightcrawlers so I decided it was time to move on.

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By the time I got to Burdette Park it was raining fairly hard so I bundled up in rain gear and set up my rods on the lower lake. The lake’s water level was significantly lower than I had expected, so I only worked the areas by the lily pads. This was probably the smartest thing I did today, I caught quite a few nice sized bluegill and rock bass. After a while the fish started getting smart and stopped biting, so I relocated the creek that feeds into the pond. I started working this area with minnows and had no interest so I switched to the last of the worms I had with me. I hooked a bluegill, warmouth or rock bass on each cast. The true spectacle that I caught from the creek the bluegill below

1024151535     I was amazed that with a scar that deep that his spine hadn’t been severed. This crane attack survivor was thriving and was the biggest bluegill I caught in the creek. All the fish after him were too small to even warrant a picture. Hopefully this storm front means that the temperatures will drop back down and the big fish start feeding again.