November is a Fisherman’s Dream

I love fishing in all the seasons, each one holds something special that appeals to me. But I have always been partial to fall. The combination of the weather, the colors, and the purely ridiculous number of fish that can be caught make it an anglers dream. One of the things that is captivating to me most about fishing in the fall is the constant flux of the weather and water conditions. One day it can be in the 60’s with great water visibility, and then the next it’ll be in the 30’s muddy and rainy. I like the daily challenge and unpredictability of this season, it helps force me to test new tactics for fish and forces me to explore different methods of fishing than I am not already comfortable with. November has been a wildly successful month, I’ve been fortunate enough to get in a good amount of fishing in all sorts of locations, ranging from the Ohio River down to small public ponds.

It seems that my fall fishing always starts at Garvin Park, for some reason I’m still a sucker for the stocked trout. I would rather the funds being used for these fish be put into the native species for this area, but since I’m not in charge of making that decision I’ve decided to just go with it and enjoy the opportunity to catch them. Plus it is always a good excuse to break out the 5 weight fly rod.

Rainbow Trout on the Fly

Rainbow Trout on the Fly

The stocked Rainbow Trout don’t seem to be too smart and have been willing to bite almost anything that falls right in front of their faces. Early in November I was lucky enough to stumble across a feeding frenzy happening in the shallows. You could see small groups of trout hunting in the shallow water by the shore and as soon as anything touched the water they would all start attacking it. I was armed with my ultralight that day with a small jig and lost count of the number of trout I caught. It was actually such good fishing I ended up keeping my limit, a very rare thing for me to do (though I will admit this was mostly because they are stocked fish and can’t survive the summers so I don’t feel bad taking them).

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout

I caught a lot of trout in November, but one of my biggest goals was to capture some good images of these fish. Last year I was so excited to just be catching trout that I didn’t do them justice in the pictures I took. One of the images I was happiest with was an oddly proportioned Rainbow Trout, but the combination of the colors on the fish with the fall leaves in the background captured the season well.

Rainbow Trout

Humpback Rainbow Trout

But I can’t let all the attention go to these seasonal invaders of the lake, I was able to catch a number of the common species that call this lake their home. You can’t fish in the fall without enjoying how greedy bass get. I don’t usually spend much time bass fishing, much less at this park. But I figured with the way the fish were biting I may as well embrace it and managed a few above average from this lake.

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

One of the reasons I like the lake at Garvin Park is the large population of Warmouth that live there. The shallows are full submerged timber, the classic ambush point for this fish to hide in. I usually have a very difficult time hunting down Warmouth once it starts getting cold, so you can image how happy I was to still be finding them in the shallow structure.

Warmouth

Warmouth

No fishing trip at Garvin Park would ever be complete unless you accidentally caught a catfish. This tends to be the fish species people are most commonly fishing for here, and there doesn’t really seem to be any shortage of these little Channel Catfish.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

One thing I’ve always found interesting about this lake is the ratio of Bluegill to Redear Sunfish. For some reason a lot of these smaller urban lakes have really large populations of Bluegill, and very small populations of Redear Sunfish. And this lake follows that pattern, though I was lucky enough to manage to hook a few of them while jigging for trout.

Redear Sunfish

Redear Sunfish

As November started passing by I knew my window for wading Pigeon Creek was starting to close (and it did occasionally flood enough to be unsafe to wade). I know how fickle this creek can get once it gets truly cold so I wanted to make sure I spent some more time here before winter starts to set in. As you would expect with me I can’t go to a creek without microfishing, I wasn’t able to find any new species this month. But I was happy to see some familiar faces. I caught a ridiculous number of Emerald Shiners this month, with a much smaller number of Mimic Shiners mixed in. Occasionally a small catfish would find my bait first, which is always a pleasant surprise.

Mimic Shiner

Mimic Shiner

Emerald Shiner

Emerald Shiner

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

I still haven’t ever gotten over my obsession with sunfish, for some reason no matter what species I’m after I tend to return back to them. And Pigeon Creek is one of the places that I really enjoy fishing for them at, I like the added challenge that current gives. I have waded enough of this section of the creek to have a decent idea of where my best chances are to catch them at and have been lucky enough to catch a good number of fish. One of them being a surprisingly large Bluegill, he fought so hard I wasn’t really sure what I had hooked until I landed the fish.

Bluegill

Bluegill

One of the cool catches I stumbled across while wading for sunfish was the first Hybrid Sunfish I have ever caught from this creek. I figured they would be around, but in all the years I’ve fished here I had never managed to hook into one.

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

And the fish that always likes to steal the show has been still showing some surprisingly bright colors for this late in the year. The Longear Sunfish have become harder and harder to track down as the water temperatures have dropped, but each time I find one they seem to still be carrying some brilliant colors.

Longear Sunfish

Longear Sunfish

I suppose one thing I should point out at this point is that when I’m wading the creek I’m always using my ultralight rod rigged with 4 pound test line. So you can imagine my surprise to find a large drum on the end of my line while fishing for Bluegill. After putting up a hard fight, and using the current to its advantage I was lucky enough to be holding a gorgeous copper colored Freshwater Drum.

Freshwater Drum

Freshwater Drum

I really haven’t fished the Ohio River much since returning to Indiana, so I decided to dedicate one evening to fishing it. I took my usual approach to fishing the river, I found a good current break by a boat launch and set up my rods there. I quickly microfished up a few small Emerald Shiners to use as live bait. I cast those out to the deeper water on the edge of the current and let it drift into the calmer water and simply waited for a bite. It didn’t take long before the first fish bit and I was holding a lovely little White Bass.

White Bass

White Bass

As the sun started to set the bite started to pick up and I managed to catch my first Hybrid Striped Bass of the evening. I’ll be honest when I set the hook and reeled it in I didn’t really realize I had a fish on the other end of the line, I guess that was the downfall of using a slightly heavier river rod.

Hybrid Striped Bass

Hybrid Striped Bass

I think it should be no surprise that using this tactic also resulted in a few small Channel Catfish. I’ve found over the years that my luck with catfish at the river is mostly just bound to Channel Catfish. I still haven’t managed to catch my first Blue Catfish of the year…and I’m almost out of days in the year to make that happen.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

As it got dark the bite slowed down to a crawl but I didn’t want to give up until I had caught a few more fish. I caught a larger live bait and cast it back out and waited. As I was starting to get chilled to the bone my line twitched and I set the hook into the first Striped Bass of the evening. Nothing helps warm you up like catching a fish.

Striped Bass

Striped Bass

As I was microfishing for Emerald Shiners to use for bait I had the pleasant surprise of stumbling across a number of very small Freshwater Drum. I even broke my personal smallest Freshwater Drum (a thing only a true microfishing nerd would say). It was cool to get to see them at this size, I usually find them when they are at least hand sized.

Freshwater Drum

Freshwater Drum

No fall fishing is complete without visiting the State Hospital Park to do some crappie fishing (though I feel like I’d say that in about any season, simply because I really enjoy the challenge of crappie fishing there). Plus this lake produces some of the prettiest White Crappie I have ever seen.

White Crappie

White Crappie

I’ve fished this lake almost all of my life, and it still seems to bring the occasional surprise. This time it was in the form of large Golden Shiner! I have never once seen a shiner in this lake, much less one this size. So that was a very exciting catch, though it will be something I’ll be keeping my eye out for. I’d be curious to know if this is a lone escapee from a bait bucket or if there is an established population.

Golden Shiner

Golden Shiner

One of the highlights from November was getting the opportunity to fish a private lake that sees very little fishing pressure. We were asked by the landlord to thin the crappie population, which was something my fishing partner and I were more than willing to do for him. The cool thing about this lake is not only does it have Black Crappie in it, but it has Blacknose Crappie in it. This fish is the result of a recessive gene and is the only location I’ve found with them in Indiana so far.

Blacknose Crappie

Blacknose Crappie

Plus this lake has some of the most aggressive Hybrid Sunfish I’ve ever seen, and with the lack of fishing pressure there is a good number of very large ones. This one was aggressive enough to attack a lipless crankbait!

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

I think we lost count of the number of crappie we caught that day, which is always a sign of a good time. We are both fairly stubborn people and we decided we were going to catch at least one fish on the fly rod even though it was cold and windy. To our surprise we were able to cast to deep enough water to reach the crappie. I stuck with a simple streamer pattern and found some very willing Black Crappie (a few that ended up being part of a Thanksgiving fish fry).

Black Crappie

Black Crappie

I know fall is starting to come to an end when Blue Grass FWA closes down for duck hunting. There was a one week break in the middle of duck season where the lakes were open to fishing and took advantage of it, knowing it would likely be February before I could fish there again. I didn’t have any big goals going there, I knew the conditions were going to make the bite difficult. But I really just wanted to catch a Longear Sunfish and then I would be happy. My first stop didn’t result in a Longear Sunfish, but rather a very aggressive Hybrid Sunfish.

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

I switched over to microfishing tactics at this spot thinking maybe I could catch a juvenile Longear Sunfish. Sadly this didn’t happen, but to my surprise a Green Sunfish found my tiny bait and managed to stay hooked! These little guys have a tendency to either brake my leaders or shake my tiny hooks.

Green Sunfish

Green Sunfish

While exploring around for potential spots for Longear Sunfish I came across the largest group of Blackstripe Topminnows I have ever seen. Without fear of exaggeration there were easily over 100 grouped up together in a shallow stretch of water that connects the lakes together. I couldn’t help but take advantage of this and catch a couple to get a good picture of the species for my records.

Blackstripe Topminnow

Blackstripe Topminnow

At my final stop of the day I finally found the habitat I was looking for and found the fish that I was after. The water was cold and this little guy didn’t have the brightest colors, but that didn’t matter to me. I was just happy to have found the fish I was after and being able to say farewell to Blue Grass FWA on a high note until the spring.

Longear Sunfish

As you can see my November has been a mixed bag of a little bit of everything. And honestly that is what makes fishing so much fun to me. I like that this season doesn’t let me get in the rut of fishing one specific way for a specific species. It gives that extra bit of encouragement to get out and try different styles of fishing at different places. I hope you all have been getting out and enjoying this last bit of fall before winter sets in.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

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Pigeon Creek: Southern Indiana’s Most Misunderstood Creek

Pigeon Creek is a fairly large creek that runs through a small section of southern Indiana before flowing into the Ohio River. For a lot of its history it has been known for being a heavily polluted waterway, and that view of the creek really hasn’t wavered in the area. There have been some improvements in the water quality of the creek, but I’ll be the first to admit this creek still has a long way to go before I’d ever consider consuming fish from it. That being said, the improvements made on this creek have made it one of the hidden gems of southern Indiana. This creek is often overlooked by anglers because of the stigma that this creek is terribly polluted, but I’m writing this article to try to get you to reconsider this waterway.

Pigeon Creek
Pigeon Creek during low water conditions

This creek has always offered good fishing year round, it just takes a little bit of searching to finding the places worth investing the time in. My favorite time of the year to fish it is in the late fall when the water levels have dropped very low and the pools are very obvious. The deeper pools always seem to hold fish, but the more interesting features to me have always been the runs between riffles, or the eddies formed by fallen logs in the current. These places tend to be overlooked by any of the few other anglers that venture along the creek. If you ever see me at the creek it will often be waded out in the riffles exploring spots like this to find new species.

Wading the creek is not only relaxing, but gives you access to some species that most conventional anglers won’t catch. As you all should expect by now, this does mean I will be doing some microfishing in this shallow water and any good eddies I can find. You can’t seem to fish any body of water in Indiana without first coming across the humble Bluegill.

After catching a few small Bluegill, a new species found my bait! To my surprise this was a species I didn’t have on my list yet: the Emerald Shiner. While these are an incredibly common fish, I hadn’t ever put the time into finding a place to catch them. So that was an excellent surprise!

Soon after that little fish I found a familiar face, a little Mimic Shiner! This has always been the main base forage species I’ve observed in the creek.

At this point I had lost count of how many Mimic Shiners and Emerald Shiners I had caught from the creek and was starting to give up on finding any other cool species in the eddies. On one of my last casts into the eddy something different found my bait. I was elated to find a Bluntnose Minnow (a species I had embarrassingly misidentified on my list previously)!

With this boost of confidence I fished that spot a little more and found another familiar face: the Spotfin Shiner. For some reason I forgot to take a picture of it in by the water, but I do have an image from my photography tank.

I figured for the sake of having an accurate sampling of the minnows I should also spend a little bit of time checking out the local topminnows/livebearers. I was secretly hoping I would find something new, but I think I knew better. As expected the local populations were Western Mosquitofish and Blackstripe Topminnows.

Knowing my luck with the minnows was starting to run out I switched over to a size 16 fly hook and baited it with a small piece of worm and explored around in hopes of finding the sunfish that I knew had to be around. I was astonished that one of my first finds was actually an Orangespotted Sunfish! I had never sampled one from moving water before!

After this happy surprise I went on the search for a Green Sunfish. This stretch of creek has some rock formations that provide some excellent hiding places. And it is no secret that Green Sunfish like to hide in places they feel hidden so they can ambush anything that passes by. It only took dropping my bait by a few rocks before I had a bite.

After catching a few more of his friends, I started the search for the bigger and more colorful species of sunfish. I already knew Bluegill lived in this creek, but I wanted a mature specimen for a picture so I waded for a while and found a good population of them. Eventually luck was on my side and I hook into a solid Bluegill, surprisingly the big ones were more willing to hit small cutbaits than worms.

While searching for the Bluegill I had another less common catch, a Redear Sunfish. While it isn’t really a surprise that they would be here, I had never heard of one being sampled here before.

This brings us to the main reason I love creek fishing, this creek has a very strong population of Longear Sunfish. One of the prettiest sunfish in my humble opinion. It was hard to pick just one image to include in this post, but this smaller fish did the best justice to the colors that these fish have.

This creek has always been known to hold great numbers of Channel Catfish, and I can assure you that is still true. On my wading trips I’ve lost count of the number of juvenile catfish I have caught. The bigger ones tend to show themselves typically when it is least convenient. In my case after having two of my micro fishing hooks stolen! I rigged up a stronger setup and put a bait back in the same place. Before you knew it I was battling a decent Channel Catfish.

Along with the Channel Catfish this creek will also hold Flathead Catfish this time of year. I was lucky enough to cross paths with a micro version of this species while drifting worms in a deep pocket right before some riffles. I can assure you there are much larger specimens in this creek, but this was by far the coolest one I’ve come across yet.

The final species that you expect to catch this time of year is the Freshwater Drum. I have a true appreciation for this fish, and am always happy to catch one (they force you into learning to detect very subtle bites, or you risk gut hooking these fish often). Along with the typical small Freshwater Drum you’d expect to find, I did manage to hunt down a few of the larger specimen (large being relative to this creek).

This creek holds many different species depending on the time of year, we haven’t even touched on the Blue Catfish that you’ll find in the spring or the amazing gar fishing that can be had in the summer. There are so many amazing species in this creek, and so few people are even willing to explore it. Hopefully this post will help change a few of your minds about this wonderful place.

I want to leave you with one final image, because sometimes a picture is worth more than words. If this creek was really so bad, why would a fool like me be this excited to be standing in the middle of it? I think the smile on my face every time I’m here would make a solid case in defense of the creek alone.

Longear Sunfish
Even on a very chilly late October day this creek still manages to bring a smile to my face

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Finding Fish In The Big City

One of the skills I’ve been working on trying to improve this year has been micro-fishing. It is far from the conventional form of fishing, but it is a great way to get to see biodiversity that simply gets ignored. California has a good number of nonnative populations of fish, the most common being Tilapia. There was no shortage of Tilapia in any size range in the lakes and creeks in Los Angeles.

In one creek I stumbled across a large school of juvenile Mozambique Tilapia feeding on algae growing on rocks. I was immediately curious if these fish would be willing to bite anything other than algae, so I tied on my smallest hook. I figured my best bait choice was going to be corn, so I put the tiniest piece on the hook and then dropped the bait into the school of fish. To my surprise they actually seemed to be interested in the bait. After stealing the corn a few times I finally managed to hook one of these little beauties.

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Mozambique Tilapia

One of the most common forage species I found in the lakes was the Inland Silverside. I’m always happy to catch a Silverside, and this gave me the chance to add another one to my list. These fish love eating little bugs that are foolish enough to land on the surface of the water. This makes them a perfect fish to catch on micro-flies. After seeing the schools of them I tied up some tiny size 28 flies for them. It didn’t take long at all to trick the first one into biting.

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Inland Silverside

The coolest freshwater species I stumbled across in Los Angeles is actually a very common aquarium fish, the Convict Cichlid. This fish are obviously not native to this area, but seem to have become well established after someone decided they didn’t want them anymore. These little fish seemed to love shallow rocks in highly aerated water and had quite the appetite for worms.

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Convict Cichlid

While we are on the topic of nonnative fish species, we will quickly revisit Tilapia. Because I didn’t only target micro-Tilapia, I did spend some time trying to catch a few decent specimens of the species I could find. It turns out these fish are big fans of both canned corn and tortillas. I would just free line either of these on a small hook and they always seemed to find it.

Blue Tilapia

Mozambique Tilapia

Most of my friends from Indiana were excited for my chance to catch some California Largemouth Bass. I really didn’t spend any time seriously fishing for them, but I did catch a few while exploring around. The strangest one I caught was from the Los Angeles River, it was an oddly proportioned fish…but it was still cool to see that there was life there! Luckily for me there was a short period during the summer that they opened sections of the river up to recreation so I was able to fish it once before summer ended.

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Largemouth Bass

I didn’t really ever target Catfish specifically, but still managed to catch a few of them. I managed to catch both Channel Catfish and Black Bullheads out of lake drain while drifting worms for Tilapia. They would surprise me each time, I was expecting to catch 4 inch Tilapia and instead I would hook into a fish pulling drag on my ultralight rod. It was a rather fun surprise!

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Channel Catfish

This little Black Bullhead was giving me some serious attitude while unhooking him. I think the moment was captured perfectly!

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Black Bullhead

The fishing that I enjoyed the most while out there was the saltwater fishing. We first turned our attention to pier fishing, since it didn’t require a fishing license (and I tried putting off buying a license as long as possible). It took a few trips to figure out pier fishing again, this fishing was much harder than what we experienced in Florida. I rediscovered that shrimp was a superior bait to squid in most circumstances. Casting in between the pier pilings seemed to be the fastest way to get a bite and this resulted in a good number of Kelp Bass.

Kelp Bass

Kelp Bass

But every now and again a Barred Sand Bass would make an appearance.

Barred Sand Bass

The coolest species that I caught using this method was a Xantic Sargo. I kept getting bites that were stealing my shrimp, so I downsized my hooks and found out these little guys were the ones taking my bait.

Xantic Sargo

The Mackerel were chasing schools of small white fish around the edges of the pier, and instead of most people who were chasing the Mackerel I was actually after the little white fish. I wasn’t quire sure what they were, but most of the schools couldn’t have cared less about my bait. Finally one of the fish broke from the school and investigated my offering of a tiny piece of shrimp. To my surprise this little fish decided to bite and I quickly added another species to my list! Everyone else on that pier thought I was crazy, but I was rather happy with my catch.

Topsmelt

I saved the best for last, the fish I was most proud of catching was caught on my first time surf fishing. I will be the first to admit I know nothing about surf fishing, we arrived at low tide and fished as it rose. I tied up a texas rig with 1 1/2 oz of lead above a small hook rigged with shrimp. I would cast this out and slowly reel it back in, trying my best to feel bites (a difficult task with the small 6 ft freshwater rod I was using). After losing more fish than I am willing to admit, I finally hooked a fish. To my utter surprise I had one of my bucket list fish species on the other end of my line! This little Leopard Shark made the whole day worth it. I didn’t get a single bite after him, but I didn’t mind.

Leopard Shark

I think I can safely share a few observations about how to be successful at surf fishing: A 6 ft freshwater rod really isn’t a great thing to use, 12 pound monofilament line is rather stretchy for this kind of fishing, shrimp casts off very easily (maybe put a piece of squid on there too just so you don’t waste too many casts) and you probably should have actual weights to use (combining 1/2 oz weights to get the size you need only half works). If learn from my mistakes you should be far more successful!

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Road Trip To California

I’ve been anxiously waiting for this road trip for a long time. I was simultaneously terrified and exhilarated at the thought of moving from the Midwest to California. As my departure date got closer and closer, I started getting more and more anxious, but instead of letting that get to me, I invested as much as that energy as I could into researching and planning each stop of my trip. Finally, on a bright Tuesday morning, my day arrived: I hopped into my little SUV (full of my life in boxes) and started my trip.

The first leg of my journey took me from Indiana to the Meramec River near St. Louis, Missouri. My research told me that this river was a great spot to catch Redhorse suckers of multiple species. Sadly, once I got there, I didn’t feel very confident about my prospects. I had picked a location that was too close to the Mississippi River, and as expected, I could not get past the great number of Freshwater Drum and Channel Catfish to get to any of the more exciting species.

Freshwater Drum

Channel Catfish

Seeing that I wasn’t going to catch my target species, I switched over to my microfishing tactics. I was hoping I could find something exciting before the hour and a half I had budgeted for this spot ran out. But no new species made an appearance. I ended up catching a good number of small Bluegill, Spotfin Shiners and Steelcolor Shiners. They were all cool fish to catch, but nothing that helped me to add fish species to my list.

Bluegill

Spotfin Shiner

Finally realizing that I wasn’t going to be able to add any new species at this spot, I hiked back to my car to finish up the drive for the day. I drove west until I got to the other end of Missouri and camped at Shoal Creek.

Shoal Creek

My goal was (once again) to catch any form of a sucker. As soon as I approached the shore, I saw a small Northern Hogsucker and thought perhaps it wasn’t going to be a difficult thing. But I was so very wrong. That particular sucker disappeared as I was getting my rods set up, and I didn’t see another for the rest of my time there. I spent some time targeting suckers, but once it became clear that wasn’t going to happen during the day time, I switched my attention over to sunfish. One of my goals was to catch a Missouri Longear Sunfish. These fish look dramatically different than the Longear Sunfish we had in Indiana. These have much deeper reds as well as a red line down the nape.

Longear Sunfish (Missouri)

Once I caught one of these gorgeous sunfish, I started trying to catch as many species as I could before it got dark. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this creek was wildly diverse.

Largemouth Bass

Bluegill

Rock Bass

Redear Sunfish

Black Crappie

I had hoped that once it got dark the sunfish would stop finding my baits as often and I would be able to keep a bait in place long enough for a sucker to find it. What I forgot about was that the catfish would get active once the sun went down. As you’d expect, I ended up catching little Channel Catfish instead of suckers.

Channel Catfish

With this frustrating discovery, I decided to try something new. I’ve never microfished at night and it sounded like it could be a wildly productive thing. So, I put on my headlamp and started walking around the shallow areas of the creek. It didn’t take long to find where the various minnows were hiding. I saw a lot of species I recognized, but there were a few, odd, larger, white minnows scattered around. I had a good feeling that they would be a new species for me, so I spent my time trying to get one to bite. After a half an hour of putting a small piece of worm in front of these little fishes faces, one finally attacked the hook. As soon as I had the fish in my hand, I knew it was something new, though I’ll admit I couldn’t figure out its identity. After taking the pictures I needed, I released it back to the creek. I knew I would have plenty of time to work out its identity after this trip was done.

Whitetail Shiner

I caught a few other species during the night, but nothing new or particularly exciting. In the morning, I explored the riffles of the creek in search of another Rainbow Darter. To my disappointment, the creek was on the rise and I couldn’t find any. However, I did find the perfect habitat for Green Sunfish and took the opportunity to catch one since I didn’t have a good picture of one from this location yet.

Green Sunfish

Before starting the next leg of my trip, I wanted to catch one of the Topminnows I kept seeing. I expected them to be the usual Blackstripe Topminnows we had back in southern Indiana, but instead, they were Blackspotted Topminnows! This wasn’t a new species for me, but I still needed a good photograph of one so this was a pleasant surprise.

Blackspotted Topminnow

With that catch, I started the long drive to Texas. This was the drive I was dreading the most. Thankfully, the time changes were on my side and I got there before it got too late. I decided to camp the night at Lake Meredith, which conveniently was supposed to be good fishing. Seeing this lake was an amazing sight. I hadn’t seen any sign of water for quite some time and suddenly in the middle of this red terrain was this giant, blue mass surrounded by these gorgeous, rocky cliffs.

Lake Meredith

I had expected this lake to be a huge challenge to fish because of how large it was and the fact that the climate was so different than what I’m used to. But to my surprise, there were a large number of little sunfish in the shallows. I had expected to catch mostly Bluegill here, but here was an enormous population of Orangespotted Sunfish! I was even able to catch a few Longear Sunfish, which looked remarkably different than any of the others I’ve sampled in other states. I imagine within the next few years they will finally start separating Longear Sunfish into multiple distinct species, much like what they have been doing with black bass over the last couple of years.

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Bluegill

Green Sunfish

I kept seeing small minnows with gorgeous red fins darting around while I was fishing for sunfish, and I couldn’t leave this lake without catching one to add to my species list. I tied on a size 28 fly hook and tipped it with a small piece of worm (the Bluegill stole the last of my tango hooks when I was at the Meramec River). It didn’t take long before one of these little beauties found my bait! After getting some good photos to properly identify him, he was safely released and swam off back to other minnows in the shallows.

With that little shiner, I decided to hop back in my car and make my way down to the area below the lake’s dam, where the Canadian River starts to reform. The landscape was breathtaking, even though the rocks I had to hike over looked like rattlesnake heaven.

Here, there is a nice little fishing pier, but there was a family with two young kids fishing off it that were having so much fun that I didn’t want to crowd them. I hiked down from the dam a little ways and set up my gear in a break in the reeds. I quickly started seeing fish hanging around the rocks near the bank. The water was amazingly clear (I could see straight to the bottom at depths over 10 foot, a very different case than most waterways in Indiana). I could see many familiar fish moving around, but one type in particular caught my eye. I could see a few Golden Shiners on the outskirts of the margins, and I knew that would be my first target. I have good pictures of most of the species I’ve caught, but the day I caught my first Golden Shiner, I didn’t take my good camera and all I had was an incredibly grainy picture from an old video camera. It took a few tries to get past the large number of Green Sunfish, but I did manage to get a Golden Shiner to take a small piece of worm.

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Golden Shiner

There were a few other minnows hiding in the cracks of the shallow rocks, but once again, my search for microfish was thwarted by Western Mosquitofish. They were just too numerous for me to be able to get past, so I quickly gave up on my search.

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Western Mosquitofish

At this point, I decided to play around with the sunfish. I figured there had to be some more Longear Sunfish down here, but to my surprise, all I found were Green Sunfish, and not just a few…I have never seen so many greenies in one place before in my life. I caught close to 50 of these guys before giving up on the idea of getting any other kind of sunfish.

One of the coolest things that happened while I was fishing this spot was a small group of Bullhead Catfish wandered in and started searching around for food. I was able to pitch a worm toward them and was lucky enough to get it past the sunfish. It was amazing to see how quickly these fish could zero in on a bait. Not a new species for me, but it was pretty neat to see a Black Bullhead from a different location.

Checking my phone, I realized that it was going to get dark soon and I hadn’t even decided where I was going to camp yet. I quickly dashed to my car and found a campsite right as the sun was setting.

That ended up being a rough night of camping. First, it was hot, and then as soon as I fell asleep, a huge thunderstorm hit the area. I ended up sleeping in my car while the storm raged on. On the bright side (since I couldn’t sleep well), I was able to start my drive to New Mexico bright and early. Sadly, this drive was cut short when my alternator went out and stranded me overnight in Tucumcari, New Mexico. Luckily, there was an auto shop that was willing to work hard on my car and get me back on the road the next afternoon.

Getting Towed To A Shop

At 2 p.m. the following day, my car repairs were finished, but I still had 4 hours of driving left to get to my campsite for the evening. That short of a drive never felt so long. I knew the only thing standing between me and trout fishing was this stretch of road. But finally, the miles ticked away and I was standing on the side of the Pecos River. And I can easily say that none of pictures even do this place half justice. It was such a calm, serene, and peaceful place that I was a little tempted not to leave.

Pecos River

This stretch of the river fell into special trout regulations, meaning I had to use barbless hooks. I’ll just go ahead and say that trout fishing and barbless hooks isn’t a very good combination. Between my spinning gear and fly rod, I lost 7 trout before finally landing a little Brown Trout on a spinner (a new species for me). I think my performance proves I need to practice using barbless hooks because between them jumping and the current, they seemed to have no problem shaking the hooks.

Brown Trout

That evening, I camped beside a small stream. Once again, I had lost track of time and didn’t arrive to the site until after the sun had set. I was very happy that I had packed my winter sleeping bag for this site. Fishing in the rain all day had chilled me to the bone and I needed to warm back up. Early the next morning, I got up before the sun had broken over the horizon. The section of the stream I was camping beside had a few decent pools formed by fallen trees, so I took the chance to throw a spinner into these spots before the sun got too high. My camera doesn’t handle low light conditions well so the picture looks way darker than it actually was, but this lovely little Brown Trout bit my spinner at 6:30 in the morning…before any of the other campers were up!

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Brown Trout

With this fish, I packed up my camp and left without disturbing any of the other campers. On my way out of the forest, I passed by Monastery Lake. I hadn’t really planned to fish this lake, but I figured if I already had my fishing license I might as well catch a few stock Rainbow Trout before leaving the state. This lake was surprisingly busy, but I hiked to the far end and found a space all to myself. I was happy to find some new minnows hiding under a water drainage pipe, so I grabbed my microfishing gear and got to work. I was happy to find a strong population of Fathead Minnows- a new species for me- so I was very excited to catch one.

Fathead Minnow

I worked my around the lake a little more and targeted the down-stream side of the water overflow. I expected some Rainbow Trout to be waiting for an easy meal, but was elated to find a much more exciting species waiting: the Rio Grande Chub! I had thought that this species was going to be a long shot to catch, but there you go!

Rio Grande Chub

With that catch, all I needed was a little Rainbow Trout and I was ready to hit the road. I spent some time tossing lures at them, but they just would not hit them. Luckily, this lake allows the use of bait, so I put a piece of worm on a hook and started slowly jigging it close to the bottom. It didn’t take long before a little Rainbow Trout found the worm and struck with all of its might. After a fun fight, this fish was donated to a family who was having trouble catching dinner and I started my next long drive.

Rainbow Trout

I arrived in Sedona, Arizona to the unwelcome realization that every single campsite was full…even though none of them allowed reservations. I decided I would worry about that later, and made my way to an access point on Oak Creek in search of my first sucker of the trip.

Oak Creek

I fished a number of different pools with no luck. I kept seeing trout come up and hit the surface, but the water was too muddy to even consider getting out the fly rod. I decided to stick with my sucker tactics and keep a small piece of worm on the bottom and wait for a bite. I ran into another angler hiking out of the canyon I was fishing in and he was kind enough to point me to a place that should hold a few fish. Words couldn’t describe how excited I was when my rod tip finally bounced and my line went tight with a fish. I was even more excited when I reeled up what turned out to be a Roundtail Chub, another new species!

Roundtail Chub

I cast my rig back out and waited for a sucker to find the bait, but this time when the rod bounced something very different was on the other end…a confused little Brown Trout. I’m not really sure why he decided my sucker rig looked attractive, but he did.

Brown Trout

With this last fish, I looked up and realized that a thunderstorm was quickly approaching. I didn’t want to be stuck down here if lightning started dancing around, so I started the hike back to my car. I was lucky enough to get the last room in a cheap motel in Sedona (my only other option was to park the car and sleep in it). Bright and early the next morning, I packed up my stuff, checked out of the motel, and made my way back to Oak Creek. I wasn’t going to let this trip end until I caught a sucker. I hiked back close to area from the day before, set up my rod, and waited for a bite. A long hour passed with only a few small nibbles but no takes. Suddenly, my rod doubled over and a fish started screaming drag downstream. When it got itself wrapped up in the reeds, I was scared my 4 lb test line wasn’t going to hold up, but eventually I worked the fish out and was absolutely over the moon to be holding a Sonora Sucker.

Sonora Sucker

Sonora Sucker

I took my quick pictures and then released him back into the creek. I was shaking from excitement after that catch; I don’t think many other people get this excited to catch a sucker. I had seen a few minnows hiding near the reeds that the sucker had gotten tangled in, so I decided to tie on my micro gear and see if I could catch one. Most of them were far too small to be able to get a size 28 fly hook in their mouth, but one of the larger minnows charged my bait and I was thrilled see another new species for me: the Speckled Dace!

Speckled Dace

With this fish, I knew I was out of time and I needed to start the final leg of my drive to Los Angeles. I’ll admit that this was the part of the drive I was most anxious about: I hadn’t ever tried to navigate traffic like they have there. But I knew that it was time for me to face that fear head on. I’m happy to report that I arrived safely and that the driving wasn’t nearly as frightening as I expected. This trip was a once in a lifetime experience and I’m so happy that I’m finally out in California. Life out here is rather different than back in Indiana, but that isn’t a bad thing. There is still plenty of nature to enjoy. You just have to look in different places, and exploring for those places is half the fun!

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Now it is time to explore the fishing that California has to offer. I’ve already found some new places to try for Carp, Tilapia, Plecostomus, Largemouth Bass and Bluegill, plus the wide variety of saltwater fishing piers that can provide seemingly endless amounts of fish. But that will have to be another blog post in and of itself.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

 

A Farewell to Indiana

I can’t help but feel a little bittersweet as I’m boxing up my room in preparation to move to California. Indiana has been a wonderful place for me to grow up, I was fortunate to live in an area that I had the benefits of both city and country life. I can’t thank my parents enough for raising me to fully appreciate the wonders of nature. Growing up most of my friends became obsessed with video games, but I became fascinated by the things you could find in the woods and the water. As I grew older I learned that my true passion lived in aquatic biodiversity, and as you can probably tell that means fish.

Neither of my parents were big fisherman, but they still encouraged me to explore the things I enjoyed. I didn’t fish much when I was young, it was mostly something fun I would get to do when we went camping or visited my grandparents. We always tried to camp at least once in the fall, whether it be up at Patoka Lake or Ferdinand State Forest we did our best to go. These trips were usually when I would get to go fishing, and I was always incredibly excited when these magical days would come.

I kept fishing on and off as I got older, though I never seemed to do much catching. My dad would very patiently take me fishing and we would try our best to catch fish, even though neither of us had any clue what we were doing. One of my favorite memories fishing with him was on a camping trip in Wyoming, we both fished in this gorgeous lake at the bottom of mountain range as the fog rolled down. It was one of the prettiest and most peaceful things I have ever experienced. It is a moment I will treasure forever.

Every time we would travel west to Colorado I would get the chance to fish with my grandpa, he was (and still is) my fishing hero. He was the one who bought me my first fishing rod, a little Micro Lite from Bass Pro Shop (the rod you see me fishing with in the first picture). I’ve learned so much about fishing with him and have always loved getting to spend time by the water with him. The biggest gift he gave me was introducing me to the world of fly fishing. He was patient enough to teach a young kid like me how to cast and tie flies. This is something I still do to this day, many of the flies I tie are with feathers that he graciously let me have.

It took nine years and a lot of hair growing before I finally caught my first trout on the fly rod. As I fought that little trout all I could think about was that wonderful day in Colorado where my grandpa had taught me carefully how to cast a fly rod. To make this moment even sweeter the fly I caught it on was a pattern that he had showed me how to tie. My grandpa was very excited for me that evening when I called him to tell about my success. I couldn’t help but laugh to myself that my first trout I ever had on a fly rod was caught in Indiana of all places.

The tradition of camping with the family in the fall started to fall apart as we all grew older and all became busy. But there were a few times I was able to get my dad to go camping with me through high school. One beautiful fall day we made the familiar drive up to Ferdinand State Forest to our favorite fishing and camping spot. I remember that being one of our best camping trips ever. We had the one of the most beautiful parks in Indiana almost to ourselves and the fish were biting the whole trip. The silliest memories stick out from that trip, but I think the best part was sitting by the campfire with him eating green beans out of tin can as we sat and talked about life.

As soon as I got my first car in high school I would travel as far as the poor beat up thing could go in search of new places to fish in Indiana. In retrospect that was a terrible idea considering how often that car would break down and the fact that I had the worlds most unreliable phone. On one such occasion I drove myself 4 hours away from home to fish a lake in the middle of the forest in search of one of the only year round trout fisheries in Indiana. That day was an absolute disaster. The fish I was after wasn’t biting, and to make matters worse I dropped my phone into the lake ruining it. As it got dark I made my way back to my little beat up car and started making the drive home…until I got very lost. This was before we had a GPS and I remember searching through my Indiana map trying to find any of the crossroads I would see. This was one of those moments where I learned to become self-reliant, I was lost in the middle of nowhere with no phone to even call for help. The drive home took an embarrassing amount of time, but I was never so happy (or proud) to have my rickety old car parked in front of the house. The only photo I have from that day was of a bass I caught on a jerkbait, this couldn’t have been taken more then 10 minutes before that phone took a swim.

I only got more and more into fishing as I started college, for the first time in years I finally had large amounts of time to spend on my favorite hobby. I spent those years doing my best to try to figure out every species I could catch in this state. Indiana treated me very well and reward me with over 50 different species of fish. As I started to finalize my moving date I still had one last species I knew I couldn’t leave Indiana without catching. When I started micro-fishing I had one main goal, I wanted to catch a Rainbow Darter. Most people aren’t even aware that these tiny fish exist, but in my eyes they are considered a trophy catch. I made one last trip toward central Indiana to get in the range of this fish and met up with a fellow species fisherman who was kind enough to help me find my dream fish. Minutes before a sever thunderstorm rushed us away from the stream my tiny hook was found by my prized catch.

With this little fish it hit me that I was really about to leave my home state and embark on a whole new chapter of my life. As I released this beautiful little fish my fear of change started to switch over to excitement. Indiana has treated me well: I have met my best friends here, I fell in love here, I spent time with my family here, I became an engineer here, and I learned who I was here. I’m excited to start forming a new list like this in California. I hope you all choose to tag along with me as I go on this journey.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Fly Fishing For Bowfin

I can clearly remember the first time I ever saw a Bowfin: I was fishing a little irrigation ditch that ran through some corn fields when this strange looking fish slowly surfaced and gulped some air before disappearing back into the muddy water. As soon as I saw that fish I knew a new obsession was starting. I spent the next trips out there experimenting with different tactics and baits before landing my first Bowfin. From then on it was a constant search for these prehistoric fish, trying to catch them in different venues and figuring out all the different ways I could trick on into biting. Now years later from that first encounter, I still go through phases of being purely addicted to catching these fish. The habitat they live in always draws me in, something about backwater creeks has always made me feel at peace.

One of the coolest things about this fish is the wide variety of baits they will bite. Not many fish will hit a piece of cut bait with the same enthusiasm that they will explode on a popper. This unique feeding habit makes them a particularly fun fish to fish for, you can fish for them like bass or catfish and you will still manage to catch fish. When I first started fly fishing I thought about how much fun it would be to catch a Bowfin on my fly rod, but then quickly assumed that it would be too challenging to actually accomplish and discarded the idea. This month that dream popped in my head again when I saw a Bowfin surface and gulp air. I jogged to my car and grabbed my 5 weight fly rod and tied some 12 pound leader to it. I then grabbed my bass flies and searched through them to see if anything in there would fool a Bowfin. I settled on a white streamer to imitate a bait fish and headed back to the creek.

I knew hooking a fish was going to be challenging, and landing one was going to be even harder. This creek is full of lily pads lining the edges, so first I would have to coax a Bowfin out of that cover, hook it and then find a way to get it through the lily pads without getting tangled in them. But I am nothing if not stubborn, so I figured if I was careful enough and attempted it enough times I would land a fish. I found a spot I thought I could land a fish at and proceeded to make cast after cast to the edges of the lily pads. I would cast, let the streamer sink, and then slowly strip it in (making sure the streamer stayed close to the bottom). After about a half hour of tiresome casting a fish found my fly, I strip set into the fish and the fight was on! As soon as the fish got hooked it made a mad dash trying to get back into the lily pads, luckily for me my little 5 weight rod had enough backbone to keep the fish out. You wouldn’t believe how relieved I was when I finally had this fish in my net.

I’ve never had a fish fight so hard before on my fly rod, so I couldn’t resist returning and trying to duplicate the experience. Most people would think I was crazy casting a fly into this muddy water, but I knew what was in there waiting for an easy meal. That evening I managed to put 2 fish in the net on white streamers.

I’ve since tried some different patterns for Bowfin, but I keep returning to these white streamers. It seems no matter how muddy the creek is they still manage to find these flies.

I know most people’s passion for fly fishing will always be with trout, but these fish will always be my prized catch. I would encourage you all to break out your fly rod and try to hook into one of these toothy, prehistoric fish. I’m sure after you set a hook into your first one they will have you coming back to do it again.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

A Fish Per Day…

This month I decided to take on a simple challenge: catch at least one fish every single day. My work schedule allows me to stop at a lake for about an hour on the way home, so I thought I had the decent shot at accomplishing it. This is how my month went…

May 1st: Yellow Bullhead

May 2nd: Warmouth

May 3rd: Redear Sunfish

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May 4th: Green Sunfish

May 5th: Largemouth Bass

May 6th: Bluegill

May 7th: Redear Sunfish

May 8th: White Crappie

May 9th: Bluegill

May 10th: Largemouth Bass

May 11th: Hybrid Sunfish

May 12th: Channel Catfish

May 13th: Largemouth Bass (caught while micro-fishing)

May 14th: White Crappie

May 15th: Redear Sunfish

May 16th: Redear Sunfish

May 17th: Warmouth

May 18th: Flier Sunfish

May 19th: Flathead Catfish

May 20th: Bowfin

May 21st: Green Sunfish

May 22nd: Channel Catfish

May 23rd: Largemouth Bass

May 24th: Black Crappie

May 25th: Warmouth

May 26th: Grass Pickerel

May 27th: Striped Bass

May 28th: White Crappie

May 29th: Warmouth

May 30th: Bluegill

May 31st: Redear Sunfish

This has been a fun month of fishing, by the end of the month I was surprised to see all of the different species of fish I had caught. This has been interesting challenge, and it been a nice way to force myself to take a break after work before working on the projects I have going on at home. I think the best way to understand how rewarding this has been would be to do it yourself. So with that in mind, I challenge you all to give it a try too.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Creek and River Hopping

Watching the water levels change in the Ohio River is my favorite part of driving to school every day. When I see it rising high enough to start entering the flood plains, I never fail to get excited. This always means two things: Any eddies you can find on the main stem of the Ohio River should be full of fish, and all of the creeks should also be teaming with fish escaping the high current.

The river was starting to reach that magical height when I decided to play a risky game. One of my favorite challenges in fishing is using an ultralight setup in the most difficult conditions possible, and the Ohio River never ceases to offer opportunities to test your abilities. On a lovely Sunday afternoon, I found myself beside the boat launch at Angel Mounds armed with a couple of my lightest rods. I rigged them with a simple, tight line setup with nightcrawlers and cast them into the current break downstream of the launch. It didn’t take long before my first rod bounced and I set the hook into a lovely little Channel Catfish.

It seemed like every ten minutes or so, a rod would bounce and I would reel up a small Channel Catfish or Freshwater Drum. I played with these fish until some large logs got washed downstream into this eddy and made fishing impossible.

The water stayed high throughout most of this month, so I spent a lot of time creek hopping. [Location name redacted] is one of my favorite places to fish when the river levels are high. This backwater creek is always full of species that many people don’t target. I usually target the deeper sections of the creek early in the year, but with the temperatures starting to creep higher the fish have been moving to the shallower sections of the creek. These fish are always easily spooked, but that makes the challenge of catching them all the more fun. On my first hike back to a shallow stretch here, I thought I spotted something I hadn’t seen in two years: a Grass Pickerel. But before I could investigate, the fish vanished across the creek. I managed to scare this fish off during my next three ventures, but on a lucky hike, I managed to catch it off-guard and landed a small jig right in front of his face. To my surprise, the fish made a quick dash and my jig vanished. I set the hook and was delighted to see a small Grass Pickerel.

After documenting its size and location, I released this little fish back into the creek and moved on to my next spot. The lily pads have started to grow here and a decent number of predatory fish are taking advantage of them as ambush points. Like this little Largemouth Bass.

Another stretch of this creek held a fish I hadn’t seen inhabit this waterway before: a little Redear Sunfish. It turns out that this section of the creek now houses a large number of these fish! I’ve fished this creek for years and this is the first time I’ve ever seen them, so that is a pretty interesting new change.

I couldn’t give up on this spot until I caught one of all time favorite fish, the Flier Sunfish. This one had to be tempted with Bee Moths put on the smallest jig I could find.

This little stretch of the creek housed some amazing panfish diversity. Tossing my jig toward a branch that was partially submerged, something darted out and attacked my jig but managed to miss the hook. I tossed back into that spot, and this time the fish didn’t get as lucky. After a quick fight on light tackle, I was greeted with a feisty little Warmouth. These guys start getting abundant in this creek come May.

That same branch seemed to be home to another similar species: the Green Sunfish. My favorite comparison I’ve heard is that they are the “micro version” of a grouper, and I couldn’t agree more. They put up a great fight on light tackle and are very willing to hit most baits.

As the month continued, the weather kept getting nicer and more people have been deciding to get out and go fishing. I’m always excited to see people out fishing and enjoying nature, but this is usually when I start going to some of my more remote places where I know less people will be at. This led me to one of my favorite little creeks in Evansville: Locust Creek. This creek is always filled to the brim with Creek Chubs, and this is the time of year when they are all getting ready to spawn. My main goal of the day was to catch some small ones for bait on Pigeon Creek, but I was also hoping to hook into a spawning male. After filling my bait bucket with enough small creek chubs to last the day, I turned my attention to trying to catch a larger male. Before long, I set the hook into what I suspected to be a small Largemouth Bass, but turned out to be a large Creek Chub in full spawning attire. During spawning season, the males grow tubercles and in this case also took on the rusty orange color that adult creek chubs can have.

After happily catching my fair share of Creek Chubs, I packed up and drove to my favorite section of Pigeon Creek. After a long hike with a very heavy bait bucket, I set up my three rods in hopes of finding my first Flathead Catfish of the year. The bite was incredibly slow and the fish seemed to be remarkably skilled in hitting my bait and then instantly snagging my line around the debris on the bottom of the creek. But after an hour of frustration, one of my poles doubled over and the battle was on. I carefully worked the fish out of the log jam it tried to wrap itself in and was thrilled to see a Flathead Catfish finally break surface.

I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to try to catch one of the Gar that I kept seeing surfacing around me. I finally found one that was cruising right below the surface, and I quickly put a minnow on a treble hook and cast out in front of it. The Gar dashed forward at the minnow and then dived, and my instincts said to set the hook (but I’ve made that mistake enough times to know better). So, I let the gar swim with the minnow for about 45 seconds before setting the hook, hard. The hook set perfectly in the lower jaw and I was able to easily reel in the Gar. I was even more excited when I realized that this was actually a Spotted Gar, a species that I didn’t have on my list yet.

Toward the end of the month, I returned to [location name redacted again] to see if any new species had moved into it yet. I was happy to see some Gar spawning in the backwater creek and even a few Bowfin cruising around. Sadly, my ultralight setup was not ready for the challenge of one of these toothy critters. I switched my attention back to the panfish- hoping to find a Redspotted Sunfish in Evansville. Unfortunately, the closest population I have found is still in Winslow, Indiana. However, the creek still has a stable population of Bluegill, Warmouth, Green Sunfish, Redear Sunfish, Black Crappie, and Flier Sunfish.

I still hadn’t caught a decent Spotted Bass this year, so I headed to the river to try to change that. The boat launch at Angel Mounds has a fantastic current seam that always holds a few bass when the river is rising. I set up two catfish rods like usual, and then started tossing around a small white curl tail grub on my ultralight rod. It didn’t take long before I felt a bump and I set the hook into the first species of the day: a little Striped Bass.

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The next fish to fall victim to the lure was a Skipjack Herring, the first one I’ve found this year. I ended up catching two of them and keeping both as catfish bait for a later trip.

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After catching a handful of Striped Bass and White Bass, I finally had a hit that felt distinctive from the others. I set the hook and this one fought differently. A short fight later, I was holding my first half-decent Spotted Bass of the year.

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The bait rods started getting hits, but they kept managing to miss the hook. After multiple failed hook sets, I connected with one of the small Channel Catfish that were crowding this spot.

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This was a rare occasion where the Freshwater Drum were slower to find the bait than the catfish. But eventually, I stumbled across a small one.

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Because I was getting so many small bites, I decided to downsize my hook size. This quickly resulted in what most people around here refer to as a “river minnow”- or if you are into identifying fish (like I am) a Silver Chub. This was another exciting catch since it was a first for my species list!

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The White Bass were getting active, so I couldn’t resist trying to mark off another item off my bucket list: catching a temperate bass on a fly rod. I tied on my last Clouser Minnow and got to work. It took a while, but finally my line twitched and I set the hook into the first of many White Bass.

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My success at fly fishing left me feeling accomplished, so I decided to explore some of the water upstream of the boat launch. I decided not to tempt my luck too far and only took my ultralight rod and a container of nightcrawlers. The real highlight of exploring this new stretch of water was hooking into a lovely little Longnose Gar.

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While I’ve enjoyed fishing the river, this has really been one of my best years fishing backwater creeks. I would highly suggest that any of you with access to places like this try exploring them. A lot of very cool, overlooked species are living here, and better yet, you usually know you are the only person who is fishing these spots. I will always pick these hidden backwater creeks over a trophy Largemouth Bass lake any day, and I hope you will consider giving it a try, too.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Florida Fish Species Hunt

This last month has been full of adult responsibilities: I’ve been working on finishing up my last semester of college, getting in as much time at work as possible, and finding time to fill out job applications. All of this hard work has made the reality of my final semester quite clear to me, but this also meant that this was my last chance to get to enjoy a spring break. My dad and I have talked about making a trip down to Florida to do some fishing for years, but we knew this was our last chance to make it happen. So, we both researched where to fish and started making plans. I had a pretty simple goal for this trip: I wanted to add 10 new species to my list. My dad wanted to do a little bit of bass fishing. Besides those two things, our plans were pretty wide open.

Indiana had just started changing to spring when a sudden cold snap brought back some light snow. I don’t think any other weather would have made me more excited to go to a coast.

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On the first Friday of spring break we drove all day and spent the night in a hotel. On Saturday, we got up early and drove the last bit down to Gainesville, Florida. We visited with my uncle, who lives there, and hiked around Paynes Prairie to spot some wildlife.

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This sign didn’t lie; we saw more alligators than I could count. It was easily one of the coolest places I’ve hiked yet.

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We got up bright and early Sunday morning with plans of going down to Cedar Key to do some fishing with my uncle.  It was only a short hour drive there, but I hadn’t gotten to do any fishing yet and I was starting to get excited about catching some new species. We started off by bank fishing some of my uncle’s secret spots in hopes of catching a Red Drum. We all got a few bites, but no one was able to connect with a fish. We drove around, hoping to find another good spot to fish, but the tide wasn’t where we wanted it (so we were mostly out of options). Luckily for us, there were a few public piers and bait shops nearby, so we had a fall back. I ducked into one of these shops and bought us some frozen shrimp. I didn’t really know what we would catch from this pier, but I figured that one rod with a slip rig and one rod with a tight line would give us a decent chance at catching something. The fishing started out slow, but after moving around a little bit we managed to find a deep channel running parallel to the pier that was full of Silver Perch.

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We caught a ridiculous number of these little guys, but it was an absolute blast since the morning had started off so slow. After weeding my way through a lot of these little Silver Perch, I managed to hook into an Atlantic Croaker.

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We fished until a little after lunch. We then made the drive back to Gainesville to drop off my uncle and then drive down to Lake Mary, Florida. We spent the rest of the day at my grandmother’s house and enjoyed catching up with her and her husband. We rested well that night and had big dreams about getting to fish a private lake that was rumored to have huge bass. Getting going on Monday was slow- all of the driving had started to catch up with us. But after breakfast, we drove to the lake to try our luck at some lunkers. There, the lake looked like it had potential, and on the second cast of the day I hooked into a fish. This ended up being a sixteen inch bass and I knew we would be in for a good day. Little did I know that on the third cast I would hook into the biggest fish of the day.

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We worked our way around the lake and landed close to thirty fish. Dad even managed to catch his new personal best!

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This lake seemed to be the perfect bass fishing paradise, so much so that I couldn’t resist breaking out my five weight fly rod for a little bit to test my luck. It didn’t take long before a fish fell victim to my Clouser Minnow.

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We ended our fishing adventures for the day around 4pm to run some errands for the saltwater fishing we had planned for the rest of the week. Plus, we wanted to get everything done early so that we could be well-rested and make our fishing charter in the morning.

On Tuesday, we got up before the sun rose and started down to Ponce Inlet. I was delighted to see all of the green on the drive there, but I was much more excited when we arrived at the charter and saw how beautiful the water was. We heard the usual safety speech and then we were off to find some fish. Our guide motored the flat bottom boat to an old dock that was destroyed in a hurricane. He had us using rods with 1 oz slip sinker rigs with kahle hooks baited with frozen shrimp. I hadn’t actually ever fished with kahle hooks before, so you can understand my frustration as I was getting numerous bites and not being able to connect with any of them. It took a while, but we finally figured out how to hook the fish. At the first dock, we both managed to land Lane Snapper, Mangrove Snapper, and Hardhead Catfish.

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Dad caught a few fish here that I didn’t, including a Pinfish and this lovely Pigfish.

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Motoring around the intercoastal waters, we fished many of the places the guide suggested. We had lots of bites, but we were still having trouble keeping the fish hooked with these new hooks. However, after a lot of frustration, I finally managed to land my first Pinfish (the fish I thought would have been the easiest to catch)!

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At this point, it just became embarrassing how many fish I missed, but dad had much better luck. He landed a Black Drum, Red Drum, and some Weakfish (some of which ended up coming home with us to be cooked for dinner).

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With that, our half-day on the boat was up and it was time to go to our next spot. We decided that we would go to Canaveral National Seashore with the big dream of catching my first fish while surf fishing. As soon as we arrived, it was abundantly clear that today was not the day to go surf fishing, so we decided to focus our attention on Mosquito Lagoon. We tried a few spots with little luck, and eventually ended up at the fishing docks they had built. As you’d expect, there were fish by the docks. I quickly caught my fair share of Pinfish and even got lucky enough to hook my first Southern Whiting.

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The next fishing dock we tried was closed for construction, but had the added benefit that it was built right beside an oyster bed. This spot didn’t yield any new species, but I caught more Pinfish than I could count, some Silver Perch, and some small Mangrove Snappers.

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On Wednesday, we made the drive over to Cocoa Beach to rent a kayak and fish the Banana River. My dad grew up close to the spot we fished, so he was excited to show me how the fishing was done here (and promptly out-fished me). He managed to land another Red Drum, a Spotted Seatrout, Southern Whiting and Hardhead Catfish. I only managed to land Southern Whiting and Hardhead Catfish. But it was priceless to see how excited he was when he hooked that Red Drum.

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The wind started to pick up and I was trouble keeping the kayak in the cover provided by the island, so we decided to paddle back. Our next stop was at Cocoa Beach Pier. We didn’t last long here, the bite was slow and this pier was particularly crowded.

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We decided we would try to fish at Rodney S. Ketcham Boat Ramp, which is the closest public fishing spot we could find to Canaveral Lock. Small schools of bait fish were swimming around where we could see them, so I was hopeful that we would find some predators hanging around. Dad managed to hook and land a Ladyfish on a small spoon. It was deeply hooked, so we unhooked it and released it before getting a chance to take a picture. I set up a small rig to target some of the smaller fish with shrimp. It didn’t take long before I found something willing to bite. Over the next hour, I landed a good number of Irish Mojarra and even got dad to catch his first one, too.

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After about an hour, we called it quits for the day, but we couldn’t resist going down to the lock to see what kind of fish were hanging out there. I was stunned to see the sheer number of large fish here. Everywhere you looked there were schools of fish that dwarfed everything we had caught so far this trip. I even saw my first Tarpon, and after laying eyes on it, I started to understand why there were “No Fishing” signs hanging everywhere at the lock.

Thursday was our last day of salt water fishing, so we planned to make it a special day and drive all the way down to Sebastian Inlet to try our luck at the big fish. We had heard reports of people catching large fish there recently, so we figured if they could do it, maybe we could too. We came prepared with heavy weights, new hooks, live bait, and frozen bait. We tried fishing live baits in the inlet and the ocean side with no luck, but we had driven this far and there wasn’t a chance we were leaving without catching something. I decided to shift my expectations and try to catch a smaller fish. I tied a simple tight line rig with a dropper loop and baited it with shrimp. This time, instead of casting it out, I simply lowered it down right beside the pilings of the jetty. As soon as I lowered my bait, it got a hard tap so I instinctively set the hook, expecting a little fish. The drag screamed and the fish darted- trying to break me off on the pilings. I got lucky and worked the fish out before it broke the line, but the next challenge was how to land this fish. I ended up hand lining the fish up the wall of the jetty and was amazed that the fish didn’t shake the hook or break the line. I was ecstatic to have landed my first Sheepshead, especially with how slow the fishing had been up to this point.

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I figured Sheepshead wouldn’t be the only thing near the pilings, so I lowered my rig again and quickly got another bite. This time, I was greeted by the first of many Hairy Blennies. It was amazing to see how different the coloration was between the male and female Hairy Blenny.

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I was lucky enough to catch a second type of Blenny, the Molly Miller.

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Dad even joined in on the fun and quickly mastered the art of catching these little guys.

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Before leaving, we tried fishing the section of the jetty that ran under the highway. In retrospect, we should have started fishing here because there was a fantastic current break that looked like it would hold some large fish. We ended up catching more Hairy Blennies than we could keep track of, but after weeding my way through them, I managed to hook my first Wrasse. I think that fresh water fish have some strange names, but this fish seems to have them all beat: This type of Wrasse is called a Slippery Dick.

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With this fish, we decided to move on to our final salt water location: Jetty Park in Port Canaveral. The people at this pier were some of the nicest I think we’ve met. The pier wasn’t crowded at all, so we had plenty of room to fish without having to worry about tangling up with other people’s lines. I kept fishing my tight line setup with small pieces of shrimp. I learned my lesson from Sebastian Inlet and simply lowered my rig straight down from where we were instead of casting it. It didn’t take long before a small Blue Runner found my bait.

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I seemed to get a bite each time my weight touched bottom; it was just a matter of getting a hook to hold in these little bait stealers. After a few missed hook sets, I managed to hook into my first Spottail Pinfish.

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Every time I reeled up a fish, it seemed to be a new species for me. My luck with this tactic ended with this small Atlantic Bumper.

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After this, the Harry Blennies started finding my bait before anything else could.

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It was time to try something new, so instead of fishing the side facing Port Canaveral I decided to fish the side facing the jetty. The meant making daring casts into the rocks of the jetty and hoping I’d be able to pull out whatever fish lay inside. I was once again greeted by a large number of Harry Blennies.

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But dad and I knew that there had to be more than just these hiding in the rocks. After catching my fair share of Hairy Blennies, I set the hook into something slightly larger. Luckily, this fish decided to charge out of the rocks instead of going back into the snag. I was ecstatic seeing another new species for me: a beautiful little Black Margate.

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Dad managed to catch a few Sergeant Majors off of the jetty rocks, but I couldn’t seem to get as lucky. But after moving to a few different spots, we found a nice section of rocks that was full of them and I managed to catch my first one.

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At this point, it was late in the day and we still had to make the drive back to Lake Mary. So, we decided we would catch our last salt water fish and then head out. We ended the day with a double: dad caught a Sergeant Major and I caught a Spottail Pinfish.

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Friday morning before packing, we went back to the lake we started at to get in a couple of hours of bass fishing before starting the trip home. Dad and I both managed to catch a couple of solid fish to end the trip on, but nothing that compared to the fish we landed on that first day.

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With this last bit of fishing under our belts, we packed everything up and made the drive back up to Gainsville. We visited with my uncle again and shared some fish stories. After spending some time with him, we went and checked into our hotel. That evening, we went and watched a Gator’s baseball game at the University of Florida. This was the big thing dad wanted to do this trip, and while I don’t usually enjoy sports much, I ended up having an absolute blast at the game.

Saturday morning, we got up early to go to Paynes Prairie one last time, and this time we were armed with our nice cameras to get some better pictures. Thankfully, the alligators were still out even though it was a cooler day.

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There were also a good number of gorgeous birds and cranes flying around. I even got to watch one catch a small Bowfin, a fish that I didn’t realize was really on the food chain for these birds.

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With this last adventure, we all hopped back in the car and made the long drive back to Indiana. By the end of the week, I had added 17 new species to my list and learned a lot of new things about how to fish saltwater. All in all, the fishing was great, but the real highlight of the trip was getting to spend time with my dad doing something we both enjoy.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

A Strange Winter Continues

I have always had this paradoxical obsession and hatred of the winter months. Part of me wants to prove that I am a true outdoorsman and that no weather can stop me from spending time outside, and the other part of me just wants it to be spring again and for green to start creeping into the forest. This strange dichotomy has fueled many of my fishing adventures in the winter months, though I will willingly admit that part of what always draws me to that outdoors this time of year is that rare peace and quiet that only exists in the winter.

Early in the year temperatures fell well below freezing and an exciting thought kept occurring to me. This could be the year that I was finally able to catch a fish through the ice. A few days of brutally cold temperatures finally happened and an icy film started forming on the lakes, I had my fingers crossed that we could hit that magic depth for it to be safe for me to walk out on. But I wasn’t naive enough to count on that happening, so I did some early season scouting and I had a backup plan. Our ice thickness only hit an inch and a half, so the idea of safe ice disappeared quickly. Luckily, I had found a fishing pier at a local lake that had access to 6-8 ft of water directly off its edges. So, on a chilly Monday afternoon I bundled up in all of my winter gear, tossed my ice rods in the car and drove to my secret spot. I wasted no time punching a few holes in the ice at the end of the dock and tied on a size 14 tungsten jig and tipped it with a wax worm. It didn’t take long before I felt a light tap, I set the hook hard and quickly saw the silhouette of a fish swimming under the crystal-clear ice. I carefully got the fish up through my crudely cut hole in the ice and was delighted to see a lovely little Bluegill. A quick photo session later and I released him back through the ice.

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I hadn’t in my wildest dreams thought that my plan to catch fish through a small hole in the ice would actually be effective. But after working my way through 2 containers of bee moths, I knew I had figured something out. I was hoping I would be able to get my first crappie through the ice before calling this adventure a success. But instead I hooked into a small Redear Sunfish, another first for me through the ice. With this small victory, I retreated to the warmth of my car.

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That night I dreamed of returning to the ice before this fickle winter weather melted it, but between work and school I wasn’t able to return soon enough. I was disappointed I wasn’t able to catch my first crappie through the ice, but I did mark an item off my bucket list: I caught a fish through the ice.

The weather continued its odd habits and before I knew it enough rain had fallen for the Ohio River to be in full flood stage. Most people would be fishing the river for the chance at a trophy Blue Catfish, but my target laid in a humble flooded out creek. One of my goals for the 2017 fishing season was to catch a Flier Sunfish on my fly rod, and these high-water conditions provided me with the chance at this. Armed with my 5 weight fly rod and a variety of size 12 minnow imitations I turned my focus to this creek. It didn’t take long for my first fly rod fish of the year to find my fly, a healthy little Bluegill.

 

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This fish gave me the confidence to keep fishing this spot, even with the cold-water temperature the high water seemed to have pushed a good number of fish into this stretch of the creek. I found some submerged stems from dead lily pads, and started targeting this feature. I knew that Fliers like to hug vegetation, and this was the only form of vegetation I could find in this creek. Finally, I landed the perfect cast on the edge of lily pad stems and slowly worked my minnow along them. I saw the slightest twitch of my line and instinctively set the hook expecting another little Bluegill. Suddenly a golden fish surfaced and I knew I had accomplished my goal, I quickly grabbed my net and landed my first Flier of 2017.

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To my delight this spot wasn’t holding only one Flier, but ended up catching three of them before I called the day. I snapped a quick picture with my nice camera before releasing them, this was the first time I’ve seen them take on such a vibrant golden hue. I put my 4-inch knife for scale in the picture, making the larger fish in the image below my new personal best.

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I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to try to catch my first fly rod crappie of the year while I was at this creek. I knew from past years that this creek tends to be one of the first places to fill with crappie in the spring, so I was hoping with the high water a few little crappie would have traveled upstream with the other sunfish. Much to my delight I found a school of small Black Crappie in the deeper section of the creek.

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Another week passed and the weather had continued to warm up, my dreams of learning how to catch fish in the cold were starting to disappear into dreams of fishing crappie spawn. I put in extra hours at work early in the week so that on Friday I could take a half day and enjoy the unseasonably warm weather. I had been spoiled by the early season fly fishing and just couldn’t seem to shake the fly fishing itch. As soon as I got off work I made my way to one of my most reliable lake with hopes of finding some willing Bluegill. It didn’t take long to find some hungry Bluegill that had moved up into shallow water. A few casts with a small wet fly resulted in my first Bluegill of the day.

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There seemed to be no shortage of Bluegill up in the shallows, I was even able to get them bold enough to rise to surface and strike at top water flies. I couldn’t help but smile like a little kid with the idea of catching fish on top water in the dead of winter.

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After catching my fair share of Bluegill I moved over to the deep end of the lake with the wild idea of targeting some of the crappie in the deeper water. I knew that the chances of this working were slim since I was fishing with floating line and a very short tippet. But after about 20 minutes without a fish my line made an uncharacteristic twitch and I set the hook. To my surprise I wasn’t snagged, and was battling a small crappie. A quick fight later I was holding my intended target, a small White Crappie (also the first White Crappie I caught on the fly rod in 2017)! The rest of the fish I caught that day faded in comparison to the excitement I had catching this little fish.

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The weather continued cycling from freezing cold to surprisingly warm as the winter got older. But I wasn’t going to complain about the idea of being able to fish in a long sleeve shirt, even if it only lasted for a day. I took advantage of the warm days while they lasted and turned my attention over to catching more White Crappie. The warm weather had scattered the fish throughout the water column, and these conditions are a dream for a fisherman like me. It didn’t seem to matter what depth I was fishing at I would hook into a fish, mostly they were Bluegill. But occasionally a Largemouth Bass would find my hook before a Bluegill could, and on rarer occasions a White Crappie would do the same.

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The warm weather was quickly replaced with a bitter cold wind that dropped the temperature across Indiana. Once again a thin layer of ice started forming on the lakes, but the sun came back out and melted this off quickly. This quick cold snap followed by a lot of sunlight had the bass in a feeding frenzy, and I seemed to be the only one brave (or crazy) enough to go out and try to capitalize on this bite. When I know fish are in feeding fairly aggressively I like to tie on two white grub lures and fish them at different depths. This seems to mimic a small group of bait fish, a sight a hungry bass just can’t resist. It didn’t take long for me to hook into a handful of small bass, but on the last cast of the day I set the hook into a fish that actually started pulling some drag.

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This has one of the strangest winters I have ever experienced, but it has offered some new challenges that are helping me improve my fishing skills. Easily my favorite challenge of winter was getting the chance to catch a few fish through the ice. I hope you all have been able to make the best of the odd weather we are having this year.

Tight lines,

-Isaac