November is a Fisherman’s Dream

I love fishing in all the seasons, each one holds something special that appeals to me. But I have always been partial to fall. The combination of the weather, the colors, and the purely ridiculous number of fish that can be caught make it an anglers dream. One of the things that is captivating to me most about fishing in the fall is the constant flux of the weather and water conditions. One day it can be in the 60’s with great water visibility, and then the next it’ll be in the 30’s muddy and rainy. I like the daily challenge and unpredictability of this season, it helps force me to test new tactics for fish and forces me to explore different methods of fishing than I am not already comfortable with. November has been a wildly successful month, I’ve been fortunate enough to get in a good amount of fishing in all sorts of locations, ranging from the Ohio River down to small public ponds.

It seems that my fall fishing always starts at Garvin Park, for some reason I’m still a sucker for the stocked trout. I would rather the funds being used for these fish be put into the native species for this area, but since I’m not in charge of making that decision I’ve decided to just go with it and enjoy the opportunity to catch them. Plus it is always a good excuse to break out the 5 weight fly rod.

Rainbow Trout on the Fly

Rainbow Trout on the Fly

The stocked Rainbow Trout don’t seem to be too smart and have been willing to bite almost anything that falls right in front of their faces. Early in November I was lucky enough to stumble across a feeding frenzy happening in the shallows. You could see small groups of trout hunting in the shallow water by the shore and as soon as anything touched the water they would all start attacking it. I was armed with my ultralight that day with a small jig and lost count of the number of trout I caught. It was actually such good fishing I ended up keeping my limit, a very rare thing for me to do (though I will admit this was mostly because they are stocked fish and can’t survive the summers so I don’t feel bad taking them).

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout

I caught a lot of trout in November, but one of my biggest goals was to capture some good images of these fish. Last year I was so excited to just be catching trout that I didn’t do them justice in the pictures I took. One of the images I was happiest with was an oddly proportioned Rainbow Trout, but the combination of the colors on the fish with the fall leaves in the background captured the season well.

Rainbow Trout

Humpback Rainbow Trout

But I can’t let all the attention go to these seasonal invaders of the lake, I was able to catch a number of the common species that call this lake their home. You can’t fish in the fall without enjoying how greedy bass get. I don’t usually spend much time bass fishing, much less at this park. But I figured with the way the fish were biting I may as well embrace it and managed a few above average from this lake.

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

One of the reasons I like the lake at Garvin Park is the large population of Warmouth that live there. The shallows are full submerged timber, the classic ambush point for this fish to hide in. I usually have a very difficult time hunting down Warmouth once it starts getting cold, so you can image how happy I was to still be finding them in the shallow structure.

Warmouth

Warmouth

No fishing trip at Garvin Park would ever be complete unless you accidentally caught a catfish. This tends to be the fish species people are most commonly fishing for here, and there doesn’t really seem to be any shortage of these little Channel Catfish.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

One thing I’ve always found interesting about this lake is the ratio of Bluegill to Redear Sunfish. For some reason a lot of these smaller urban lakes have really large populations of Bluegill, and very small populations of Redear Sunfish. And this lake follows that pattern, though I was lucky enough to manage to hook a few of them while jigging for trout.

Redear Sunfish

Redear Sunfish

As November started passing by I knew my window for wading Pigeon Creek was starting to close (and it did occasionally flood enough to be unsafe to wade). I know how fickle this creek can get once it gets truly cold so I wanted to make sure I spent some more time here before winter starts to set in. As you would expect with me I can’t go to a creek without microfishing, I wasn’t able to find any new species this month. But I was happy to see some familiar faces. I caught a ridiculous number of Emerald Shiners this month, with a much smaller number of Mimic Shiners mixed in. Occasionally a small catfish would find my bait first, which is always a pleasant surprise.

Mimic Shiner

Mimic Shiner

Emerald Shiner

Emerald Shiner

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

I still haven’t ever gotten over my obsession with sunfish, for some reason no matter what species I’m after I tend to return back to them. And Pigeon Creek is one of the places that I really enjoy fishing for them at, I like the added challenge that current gives. I have waded enough of this section of the creek to have a decent idea of where my best chances are to catch them at and have been lucky enough to catch a good number of fish. One of them being a surprisingly large Bluegill, he fought so hard I wasn’t really sure what I had hooked until I landed the fish.

Bluegill

Bluegill

One of the cool catches I stumbled across while wading for sunfish was the first Hybrid Sunfish I have ever caught from this creek. I figured they would be around, but in all the years I’ve fished here I had never managed to hook into one.

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

And the fish that always likes to steal the show has been still showing some surprisingly bright colors for this late in the year. The Longear Sunfish have become harder and harder to track down as the water temperatures have dropped, but each time I find one they seem to still be carrying some brilliant colors.

Longear Sunfish

Longear Sunfish

I suppose one thing I should point out at this point is that when I’m wading the creek I’m always using my ultralight rod rigged with 4 pound test line. So you can imagine my surprise to find a large drum on the end of my line while fishing for Bluegill. After putting up a hard fight, and using the current to its advantage I was lucky enough to be holding a gorgeous copper colored Freshwater Drum.

Freshwater Drum

Freshwater Drum

I really haven’t fished the Ohio River much since returning to Indiana, so I decided to dedicate one evening to fishing it. I took my usual approach to fishing the river, I found a good current break by a boat launch and set up my rods there. I quickly microfished up a few small Emerald Shiners to use as live bait. I cast those out to the deeper water on the edge of the current and let it drift into the calmer water and simply waited for a bite. It didn’t take long before the first fish bit and I was holding a lovely little White Bass.

White Bass

White Bass

As the sun started to set the bite started to pick up and I managed to catch my first Hybrid Striped Bass of the evening. I’ll be honest when I set the hook and reeled it in I didn’t really realize I had a fish on the other end of the line, I guess that was the downfall of using a slightly heavier river rod.

Hybrid Striped Bass

Hybrid Striped Bass

I think it should be no surprise that using this tactic also resulted in a few small Channel Catfish. I’ve found over the years that my luck with catfish at the river is mostly just bound to Channel Catfish. I still haven’t managed to catch my first Blue Catfish of the year…and I’m almost out of days in the year to make that happen.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

As it got dark the bite slowed down to a crawl but I didn’t want to give up until I had caught a few more fish. I caught a larger live bait and cast it back out and waited. As I was starting to get chilled to the bone my line twitched and I set the hook into the first Striped Bass of the evening. Nothing helps warm you up like catching a fish.

Striped Bass

Striped Bass

As I was microfishing for Emerald Shiners to use for bait I had the pleasant surprise of stumbling across a number of very small Freshwater Drum. I even broke my personal smallest Freshwater Drum (a thing only a true microfishing nerd would say). It was cool to get to see them at this size, I usually find them when they are at least hand sized.

Freshwater Drum

Freshwater Drum

No fall fishing is complete without visiting the State Hospital Park to do some crappie fishing (though I feel like I’d say that in about any season, simply because I really enjoy the challenge of crappie fishing there). Plus this lake produces some of the prettiest White Crappie I have ever seen.

White Crappie

White Crappie

I’ve fished this lake almost all of my life, and it still seems to bring the occasional surprise. This time it was in the form of large Golden Shiner! I have never once seen a shiner in this lake, much less one this size. So that was a very exciting catch, though it will be something I’ll be keeping my eye out for. I’d be curious to know if this is a lone escapee from a bait bucket or if there is an established population.

Golden Shiner

Golden Shiner

One of the highlights from November was getting the opportunity to fish a private lake that sees very little fishing pressure. We were asked by the landlord to thin the crappie population, which was something my fishing partner and I were more than willing to do for him. The cool thing about this lake is not only does it have Black Crappie in it, but it has Blacknose Crappie in it. This fish is the result of a recessive gene and is the only location I’ve found with them in Indiana so far.

Blacknose Crappie

Blacknose Crappie

Plus this lake has some of the most aggressive Hybrid Sunfish I’ve ever seen, and with the lack of fishing pressure there is a good number of very large ones. This one was aggressive enough to attack a lipless crankbait!

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

I think we lost count of the number of crappie we caught that day, which is always a sign of a good time. We are both fairly stubborn people and we decided we were going to catch at least one fish on the fly rod even though it was cold and windy. To our surprise we were able to cast to deep enough water to reach the crappie. I stuck with a simple streamer pattern and found some very willing Black Crappie (a few that ended up being part of a Thanksgiving fish fry).

Black Crappie

Black Crappie

I know fall is starting to come to an end when Blue Grass FWA closes down for duck hunting. There was a one week break in the middle of duck season where the lakes were open to fishing and took advantage of it, knowing it would likely be February before I could fish there again. I didn’t have any big goals going there, I knew the conditions were going to make the bite difficult. But I really just wanted to catch a Longear Sunfish and then I would be happy. My first stop didn’t result in a Longear Sunfish, but rather a very aggressive Hybrid Sunfish.

Hybrid Sunfish

Hybrid Sunfish

I switched over to microfishing tactics at this spot thinking maybe I could catch a juvenile Longear Sunfish. Sadly this didn’t happen, but to my surprise a Green Sunfish found my tiny bait and managed to stay hooked! These little guys have a tendency to either brake my leaders or shake my tiny hooks.

Green Sunfish

Green Sunfish

While exploring around for potential spots for Longear Sunfish I came across the largest group of Blackstripe Topminnows I have ever seen. Without fear of exaggeration there were easily over 100 grouped up together in a shallow stretch of water that connects the lakes together. I couldn’t help but take advantage of this and catch a couple to get a good picture of the species for my records.

Blackstripe Topminnow

Blackstripe Topminnow

At my final stop of the day I finally found the habitat I was looking for and found the fish that I was after. The water was cold and this little guy didn’t have the brightest colors, but that didn’t matter to me. I was just happy to have found the fish I was after and being able to say farewell to Blue Grass FWA on a high note until the spring.

Longear Sunfish

As you can see my November has been a mixed bag of a little bit of everything. And honestly that is what makes fishing so much fun to me. I like that this season doesn’t let me get in the rut of fishing one specific way for a specific species. It gives that extra bit of encouragement to get out and try different styles of fishing at different places. I hope you all have been getting out and enjoying this last bit of fall before winter sets in.

Tight lines,

-Isaac

Advertisements

One thought on “November is a Fisherman’s Dream

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s