Finding Fish In The Big City

One of the skills I’ve been working on trying to improve this year has been micro-fishing. It is far from the conventional form of fishing, but it is a great way to get to see biodiversity that simply gets ignored. California has a good number of nonnative populations of fish, the most common being Tilapia. There was no shortage of Tilapia in any size range in the lakes and creeks in Los Angeles.

In one creek I stumbled across a large school of juvenile Mozambique Tilapia feeding on algae growing on rocks. I was immediately curious if these fish would be willing to bite anything other than algae, so I tied on my smallest hook. I figured my best bait choice was going to be corn, so I put the tiniest piece on the hook and then dropped the bait into the school of fish. To my surprise they actually seemed to be interested in the bait. After stealing the corn a few times I finally managed to hook one of these little beauties.

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Mozambique Tilapia

One of the most common forage species I found in the lakes was the Inland Silverside. I’m always happy to catch a Silverside, and this gave me the chance to add another one to my list. These fish love eating little bugs that are foolish enough to land on the surface of the water. This makes them a perfect fish to catch on micro-flies. After seeing the schools of them I tied up some tiny size 28 flies for them. It didn’t take long at all to trick the first one into biting.

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Inland Silverside

The coolest freshwater species I stumbled across in Los Angeles is actually a very common aquarium fish, the Convict Cichlid. This fish are obviously not native to this area, but seem to have become well established after someone decided they didn’t want them anymore. These little fish seemed to love shallow rocks in highly aerated water and had quite the appetite for worms.

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Convict Cichlid

While we are on the topic of nonnative fish species, we will quickly revisit Tilapia. Because I didn’t only target micro-Tilapia, I did spend some time trying to catch a few decent specimens of the species I could find. It turns out these fish are big fans of both canned corn and tortillas. I would just free line either of these on a small hook and they always seemed to find it.

Blue Tilapia

Mozambique Tilapia

Most of my friends from Indiana were excited for my chance to catch some California Largemouth Bass. I really didn’t spend any time seriously fishing for them, but I did catch a few while exploring around. The strangest one I caught was from the Los Angeles River, it was an oddly proportioned fish…but it was still cool to see that there was life there! Luckily for me there was a short period during the summer that they opened sections of the river up to recreation so I was able to fish it once before summer ended.

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Largemouth Bass

I didn’t really ever target Catfish specifically, but still managed to catch a few of them. I managed to catch both Channel Catfish and Black Bullheads out of lake drain while drifting worms for Tilapia. They would surprise me each time, I was expecting to catch 4 inch Tilapia and instead I would hook into a fish pulling drag on my ultralight rod. It was a rather fun surprise!

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Channel Catfish

This little Black Bullhead was giving me some serious attitude while unhooking him. I think the moment was captured perfectly!

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Black Bullhead

The fishing that I enjoyed the most while out there was the saltwater fishing. We first turned our attention to pier fishing, since it didn’t require a fishing license (and I tried putting off buying a license as long as possible). It took a few trips to figure out pier fishing again, this fishing was much harder than what we experienced in Florida. I rediscovered that shrimp was a superior bait to squid in most circumstances. Casting in between the pier pilings seemed to be the fastest way to get a bite and this resulted in a good number of Kelp Bass.

Kelp Bass

Kelp Bass

But every now and again a Barred Sand Bass would make an appearance.

Barred Sand Bass

The coolest species that I caught using this method was a Xantic Sargo. I kept getting bites that were stealing my shrimp, so I downsized my hooks and found out these little guys were the ones taking my bait.

Xantic Sargo

The Mackerel were chasing schools of small white fish around the edges of the pier, and instead of most people who were chasing the Mackerel I was actually after the little white fish. I wasn’t quire sure what they were, but most of the schools couldn’t have cared less about my bait. Finally one of the fish broke from the school and investigated my offering of a tiny piece of shrimp. To my surprise this little fish decided to bite and I quickly added another species to my list! Everyone else on that pier thought I was crazy, but I was rather happy with my catch.

Topsmelt

I saved the best for last, the fish I was most proud of catching was caught on my first time surf fishing. I will be the first to admit I know nothing about surf fishing, we arrived at low tide and fished as it rose. I tied up a texas rig with 1 1/2 oz of lead above a small hook rigged with shrimp. I would cast this out and slowly reel it back in, trying my best to feel bites (a difficult task with the small 6 ft freshwater rod I was using). After losing more fish than I am willing to admit, I finally hooked a fish. To my utter surprise I had one of my bucket list fish species on the other end of my line! This little Leopard Shark made the whole day worth it. I didn’t get a single bite after him, but I didn’t mind.

Leopard Shark

I think I can safely share a few observations about how to be successful at surf fishing: A 6 ft freshwater rod really isn’t a great thing to use, 12 pound monofilament line is rather stretchy for this kind of fishing, shrimp casts off very easily (maybe put a piece of squid on there too just so you don’t waste too many casts) and you probably should have actual weights to use (combining 1/2 oz weights to get the size you need only half works). If learn from my mistakes you should be far more successful!

Tight lines,

-Isaac

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